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On the lacking visibility of management research from non-Western countries

On the lacking visibility of management research from non-Western countries <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title> <jats:p>For a long time, researchers across the world have called for more generalizable frameworks in management research, which can be used to better understand local contexts and to extend established theories in Western countries. However, research from non-Western countries is barely visible in high-impact management journals. Although most researchers have tried to understand this lacking visibility from a more technological perspective, this study aims to analyze the extent to which group psychological processes influence the selection of international publication strategies by non-Western researchers in this study.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title> <jats:p>Hypotheses were based on social identity theory. In total, 169 management researchers from India were surveyed and their social identities and the international publication strategy were assessed.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title> <jats:p>It could be confirmed that higher identification with non-Western researchers is negatively related to the intention to publish internationally.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Social implications</jats:title> <jats:p>The findings suggest that current approaches to increasing the low visibility of non-Western research require a general revision.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title> <jats:p>This study adds a new angle to the center–periphery debate by incorporating the influence of social identities on the selection of an international publication strategy. Research socialization in the periphery seems to increase the likelihood of choosing local publication outlets rather than aiming for international publications. Therefore, it is necessary to implement strategies that aim at the psychological inclusion of peripheral researchers to increase their visibility in international journals and on international platforms.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Management Research Review CrossRef

On the lacking visibility of management research from non-Western countries

Management Research Review , Volume 40 (5): 538-555 – May 15, 2017

On the lacking visibility of management research from non-Western countries


Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title>
<jats:p>For a long time, researchers across the world have called for more generalizable frameworks in management research, which can be used to better understand local contexts and to extend established theories in Western countries. However, research from non-Western countries is barely visible in high-impact management journals. Although most researchers have tried to understand this lacking visibility from a more technological perspective, this study aims to analyze the extent to which group psychological processes influence the selection of international publication strategies by non-Western researchers in this study.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title>
<jats:p>Hypotheses were based on social identity theory. In total, 169 management researchers from India were surveyed and their social identities and the international publication strategy were assessed.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title>
<jats:p>It could be confirmed that higher identification with non-Western researchers is negatively related to the intention to publish internationally.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Social implications</jats:title>
<jats:p>The findings suggest that current approaches to increasing the low visibility of non-Western research require a general revision.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title>
<jats:p>This study adds a new angle to the center–periphery debate by incorporating the influence of social identities on the selection of an international publication strategy. Research socialization in the periphery seems to increase the likelihood of choosing local publication outlets rather than aiming for international publications. Therefore, it is necessary to implement strategies that aim at the psychological inclusion of peripheral researchers to increase their visibility in international journals and on international platforms.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>

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Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
2040-8269
DOI
10.1108/mrr-02-2016-0036
Publisher site
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Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title> <jats:p>For a long time, researchers across the world have called for more generalizable frameworks in management research, which can be used to better understand local contexts and to extend established theories in Western countries. However, research from non-Western countries is barely visible in high-impact management journals. Although most researchers have tried to understand this lacking visibility from a more technological perspective, this study aims to analyze the extent to which group psychological processes influence the selection of international publication strategies by non-Western researchers in this study.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title> <jats:p>Hypotheses were based on social identity theory. In total, 169 management researchers from India were surveyed and their social identities and the international publication strategy were assessed.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title> <jats:p>It could be confirmed that higher identification with non-Western researchers is negatively related to the intention to publish internationally.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Social implications</jats:title> <jats:p>The findings suggest that current approaches to increasing the low visibility of non-Western research require a general revision.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title> <jats:p>This study adds a new angle to the center–periphery debate by incorporating the influence of social identities on the selection of an international publication strategy. Research socialization in the periphery seems to increase the likelihood of choosing local publication outlets rather than aiming for international publications. Therefore, it is necessary to implement strategies that aim at the psychological inclusion of peripheral researchers to increase their visibility in international journals and on international platforms.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

Management Research ReviewCrossRef

Published: May 15, 2017

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