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Determinants of citizens’ mobile apps future use in Chinese local governments

Determinants of citizens’ mobile apps future use in Chinese local governments <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title> <jats:p>This paper aims to explore the determinants of citizens’ future use of mobile applications provided by government. Research on citizen-initiated contacts with government has focused on both non-technology and technology related contacts. Existing research, however, has not examined the impact of mobile applications or “apps” on citizen-initiated contacts with government. Furthermore, existing research has not examined satisfaction with mobile government and whether this impacts future use.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title> <jats:p>The authors examine future use of mobile apps through an empirical analysis of a public opinion survey of citizen users in four of the largest cities in China (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title> <jats:p>Using ordered logistic regression analysis, this study found that the strongest predictors of future use were demand and satisfaction with mobile apps. However, there was no wide-scale evidence of socioeconomic status and age impacting mobile apps future use.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Practical implications</jats:title> <jats:p>The findings in this study contribute to both theory and practice of the determinants of mobile government adoption.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title> <jats:p>The results challenge the citizen-initiated contact theory, as socioeconomic status was not a major predictor of mobile apps future use in China. The results further indicate that satisfaction was a good predictor of mobile apps future use.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government People Process and Policy CrossRef

Determinants of citizens’ mobile apps future use in Chinese local governments

Transforming Government People Process and Policy , Volume 11 (2): 213-235 – May 15, 2017

Determinants of citizens’ mobile apps future use in Chinese local governments


Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title>
<jats:p>This paper aims to explore the determinants of citizens’ future use of mobile applications provided by government. Research on citizen-initiated contacts with government has focused on both non-technology and technology related contacts. Existing research, however, has not examined the impact of mobile applications or “apps” on citizen-initiated contacts with government. Furthermore, existing research has not examined satisfaction with mobile government and whether this impacts future use.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title>
<jats:p>The authors examine future use of mobile apps through an empirical analysis of a public opinion survey of citizen users in four of the largest cities in China (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen).</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title>
<jats:p>Using ordered logistic regression analysis, this study found that the strongest predictors of future use were demand and satisfaction with mobile apps. However, there was no wide-scale evidence of socioeconomic status and age impacting mobile apps future use.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Practical implications</jats:title>
<jats:p>The findings in this study contribute to both theory and practice of the determinants of mobile government adoption.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title>
<jats:p>The results challenge the citizen-initiated contact theory, as socioeconomic status was not a major predictor of mobile apps future use in China. The results further indicate that satisfaction was a good predictor of mobile apps future use.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>

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References (53)

Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/tg-11-2016-0078
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title> <jats:p>This paper aims to explore the determinants of citizens’ future use of mobile applications provided by government. Research on citizen-initiated contacts with government has focused on both non-technology and technology related contacts. Existing research, however, has not examined the impact of mobile applications or “apps” on citizen-initiated contacts with government. Furthermore, existing research has not examined satisfaction with mobile government and whether this impacts future use.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title> <jats:p>The authors examine future use of mobile apps through an empirical analysis of a public opinion survey of citizen users in four of the largest cities in China (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title> <jats:p>Using ordered logistic regression analysis, this study found that the strongest predictors of future use were demand and satisfaction with mobile apps. However, there was no wide-scale evidence of socioeconomic status and age impacting mobile apps future use.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Practical implications</jats:title> <jats:p>The findings in this study contribute to both theory and practice of the determinants of mobile government adoption.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec><jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title> <jats:p>The results challenge the citizen-initiated contact theory, as socioeconomic status was not a major predictor of mobile apps future use in China. The results further indicate that satisfaction was a good predictor of mobile apps future use.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

Transforming Government People Process and PolicyCrossRef

Published: May 15, 2017

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