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Constitution of Objects in DWR Activity

Constitution of Objects in DWR Activity <jats:p>A shared research object between teachers and researchers in Developmental Work Research (DWR) aims at development of teaching practices and forming of subject-specific knowledge. Currently, design experiments, action research, and formative interventions are used in educational research. A multitude of approaches show an overarching interest in developing teaching and learning practices. Action research and formative interventions include and empower teachers. However, in many DWR projects, teachers and researchers have different objects. In a tradition where teachers are regarded as learners, a shared research object is of interest. This chapter problematizes the relationship between teachers and researchers with the help of three DWR projects. It is challenging to establish a DWR project in which teachers and researchers aim at realising the same object. However, when this is a case, such projects may contribute to new knowledge that enhances student learning and educational, clinical, and subject-matter research. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Approaches to Activity Theory, Advances in Human and Social Aspects of Technology CrossRef

Constitution of Objects in DWR Activity

Contemporary Approaches to Activity Theory, Advances in Human and Social Aspects of Technology : 304-321 – Jan 1, 2015

Constitution of Objects in DWR Activity


Abstract

<jats:p>A shared research object between teachers and researchers in Developmental Work Research (DWR) aims at development of teaching practices and forming of subject-specific knowledge. Currently, design experiments, action research, and formative interventions are used in educational research. A multitude of approaches show an overarching interest in developing teaching and learning practices. Action research and formative interventions include and empower teachers. However, in many DWR projects, teachers and researchers have different objects. In a tradition where teachers are regarded as learners, a shared research object is of interest. This chapter problematizes the relationship between teachers and researchers with the help of three DWR projects. It is challenging to establish a DWR project in which teachers and researchers aim at realising the same object. However, when this is a case, such projects may contribute to new knowledge that enhances student learning and educational, clinical, and subject-matter research. </jats:p>

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Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
2328-1316
DOI
10.4018/978-1-4666-6603-0.ch018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>A shared research object between teachers and researchers in Developmental Work Research (DWR) aims at development of teaching practices and forming of subject-specific knowledge. Currently, design experiments, action research, and formative interventions are used in educational research. A multitude of approaches show an overarching interest in developing teaching and learning practices. Action research and formative interventions include and empower teachers. However, in many DWR projects, teachers and researchers have different objects. In a tradition where teachers are regarded as learners, a shared research object is of interest. This chapter problematizes the relationship between teachers and researchers with the help of three DWR projects. It is challenging to establish a DWR project in which teachers and researchers aim at realising the same object. However, when this is a case, such projects may contribute to new knowledge that enhances student learning and educational, clinical, and subject-matter research. </jats:p>

Journal

Contemporary Approaches to Activity Theory, Advances in Human and Social Aspects of TechnologyCrossRef

Published: Jan 1, 2015

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