Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Alcohol-related harms and street service care in entertainment districts

Alcohol-related harms and street service care in entertainment districts <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title> <jats:p>Significant alcohol use increases the risk of injuries and violence in young people. The purpose of this paper is to examine factors associated with receiving street service care for alcohol intoxication, alcohol-related injury or violence among young people in a night-time economy (NTE).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title> <jats:p>Participants included 217 young adults, 135 of whom required street service care on a Friday or Saturday evening in an Australian entertainment district. The remaining 88 young adults were a matched control sample. Participants were surveyed and provided a breathalyser sample. A multinomial logistic regression was conducted to examine the relationship between blood alcohol content (BAC) level, subjective intoxication, gender, illicit drug use, age, preloading, total drinks consumed, and the receipt of care for intoxication, injury, or violence.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title> <jats:p>Of those who received care, 70.4 per cent received it for intoxication, 19.3 per cent for injury, and 10.3 per cent following a violent incident. Male gender and high BAC level were associated with receiving support following a violent incident. High-subjective intoxication and female gender were associated with receiving support for injury.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Practical implications</jats:title> <jats:p>Results demonstrate the factors associated with receiving street service care for young people in the NTE experiencing non-emergent health needs. Further research is required to examine the impact of such a service on crime, injuries, and frontline service resources.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title> <jats:p>This is the first study to examine factors associated with receiving street service care for alcohol intoxication, injury, or violence in a NTE. Results inform policy and practice relating to the provision of street service care in the NTE for non-emergent health problems, and how this interrelates with other frontline services.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Criminological Research Policy and Practice CrossRef

Alcohol-related harms and street service care in entertainment districts

Journal of Criminological Research Policy and Practice , Volume 3 (2): 142-152 – Jun 12, 2017

Alcohol-related harms and street service care in entertainment districts


Abstract

<jats:sec>
<jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title>
<jats:p>Significant alcohol use increases the risk of injuries and violence in young people. The purpose of this paper is to examine factors associated with receiving street service care for alcohol intoxication, alcohol-related injury or violence among young people in a night-time economy (NTE).</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec>
<jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title>
<jats:p>Participants included 217 young adults, 135 of whom required street service care on a Friday or Saturday evening in an Australian entertainment district. The remaining 88 young adults were a matched control sample. Participants were surveyed and provided a breathalyser sample. A multinomial logistic regression was conducted to examine the relationship between blood alcohol content (BAC) level, subjective intoxication, gender, illicit drug use, age, preloading, total drinks consumed, and the receipt of care for intoxication, injury, or violence.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec>
<jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title>
<jats:p>Of those who received care, 70.4 per cent received it for intoxication, 19.3 per cent for injury, and 10.3 per cent following a violent incident. Male gender and high BAC level were associated with receiving support following a violent incident. High-subjective intoxication and female gender were associated with receiving support for injury.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec>
<jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Practical implications</jats:title>
<jats:p>Results demonstrate the factors associated with receiving street service care for young people in the NTE experiencing non-emergent health needs. Further research is required to examine the impact of such a service on crime, injuries, and frontline service resources.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>
<jats:sec>
<jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title>
<jats:p>This is the first study to examine factors associated with receiving street service care for alcohol intoxication, injury, or violence in a NTE. Results inform policy and practice relating to the provision of street service care in the NTE for non-emergent health problems, and how this interrelates with other frontline services.</jats:p>
</jats:sec>

Loading next page...
 
/lp/crossref/alcohol-related-harms-and-street-service-care-in-entertainment-LCyHSaQuix

References (47)

Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
2056-3841
DOI
10.1108/jcrpp-01-2017-0002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Purpose</jats:title> <jats:p>Significant alcohol use increases the risk of injuries and violence in young people. The purpose of this paper is to examine factors associated with receiving street service care for alcohol intoxication, alcohol-related injury or violence among young people in a night-time economy (NTE).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Design/methodology/approach</jats:title> <jats:p>Participants included 217 young adults, 135 of whom required street service care on a Friday or Saturday evening in an Australian entertainment district. The remaining 88 young adults were a matched control sample. Participants were surveyed and provided a breathalyser sample. A multinomial logistic regression was conducted to examine the relationship between blood alcohol content (BAC) level, subjective intoxication, gender, illicit drug use, age, preloading, total drinks consumed, and the receipt of care for intoxication, injury, or violence.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Findings</jats:title> <jats:p>Of those who received care, 70.4 per cent received it for intoxication, 19.3 per cent for injury, and 10.3 per cent following a violent incident. Male gender and high BAC level were associated with receiving support following a violent incident. High-subjective intoxication and female gender were associated with receiving support for injury.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Practical implications</jats:title> <jats:p>Results demonstrate the factors associated with receiving street service care for young people in the NTE experiencing non-emergent health needs. Further research is required to examine the impact of such a service on crime, injuries, and frontline service resources.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title content-type="abstract-subheading">Originality/value</jats:title> <jats:p>This is the first study to examine factors associated with receiving street service care for alcohol intoxication, injury, or violence in a NTE. Results inform policy and practice relating to the provision of street service care in the NTE for non-emergent health problems, and how this interrelates with other frontline services.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

Journal of Criminological Research Policy and PracticeCrossRef

Published: Jun 12, 2017

There are no references for this article.