Genetic Analysis of Children With Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) and Migraines

Genetic Analysis of Children With Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) and Migraines BRIEF SUMMARY The purpose of this study is to determine if there are genetic variations that can explain a genetic basis for cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), various phenotypes of CVS (e.g. menstrual, Sato, calendar-tied) and migraine headaches (e.g. with aura, without aura, hemiplegic migraine). This information will allow physicians to improve care for patients who have been diagnosed with this disease and to provide their parents with more complete information regarding the cause of this disease. This research is being done because many unanswered questions remain regarding children with CVS. STUDY DESIGN Time Perspective: Prospective OFFICIAL TITLE Genetic Analysis of Children With Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome and Migraines CONDITION Vomiting Syndrome Migraines PRIMARY OUTCOME Identify novel genes that contribute to the risk of CVS using genomewide association analysis approach. SECONDARY OUTCOME Perform genotype-phenotype correlations between genetic profiles and various phenotypes of CVS (e.g. menstrual, Sato, calendar-tied) and migraine headaches (e.g. with aura, without aura, hemiplegic migraine) ELIGIBILITY Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) may be the most severe recurrent vomiting disorder in - humans. CVS is characterized by a sudden onset of rapid-fire vomiting, usually beginning - in the early morning hours or upon wakening. It has a peak vomiting intensity of every - 5-10 minutes (6-12 emeses) and episodes last between 2 hours and 10 days. These episodes - of acute vomiting occur on average once every 2 to 4 weeks. The child returns to - completely normal health between vomiting episodes. Children are diagnosed based on their - specific vomiting pattern and a lack of positive findings on laboratory testing. GENDER: Both MINIMUM AGE: N/A MAXIMUM AGE: 21 Years LOCATION Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. Milwaukee. Wisconsin. 53226. United States. Recruiting. B Li, MD. 414-266-3690. bli@mcw.edu. B Li, MD. Principal Investigator. FIRST RECEIVED July 31, 2008 VERIFICATION DATE January 2010 LAST CHANGED January 14, 2010 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Genetic Analysis of Children With Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) and Migraines

Sponsored by: Medical College of Wisconsin
Phase: N/A , Start Date: Jan 20, 2008
Clinical Trials – May 2, 2016
Free

Genetic Analysis of Children With Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) and Migraines


BRIEF SUMMARY

The purpose of this study is to determine if there are genetic variations that can explain a genetic basis for cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), various phenotypes of CVS (e.g. menstrual, Sato, calendar-tied) and migraine headaches (e.g. with aura, without aura, hemiplegic migraine). This information will allow physicians to improve care for patients who have been diagnosed with this disease and to provide their parents with more complete information regarding the cause of this disease. This research is being done because many unanswered questions remain regarding children with CVS.
STUDY DESIGN

Time Perspective: Prospective
OFFICIAL TITLE

Genetic Analysis of Children With Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome and Migraines
CONDITION

Vomiting Syndrome Migraines
PRIMARY OUTCOME

Identify novel genes that contribute to the risk of CVS using genomewide association analysis approach.
SECONDARY OUTCOME

Perform genotype-phenotype correlations between genetic profiles and various phenotypes of CVS (e.g. menstrual, Sato, calendar-tied) and migraine headaches (e.g. with aura, without aura, hemiplegic migraine)
ELIGIBILITY

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) may be the most severe recurrent vomiting disorder in - humans. CVS is characterized by a sudden onset of rapid-fire vomiting, usually beginning - in the early morning hours or upon wakening. It has a peak vomiting intensity of every - 5-10 minutes (6-12 emeses) and episodes last between 2 hours and 10 days. These episodes - of acute vomiting occur on average once every 2 to 4 weeks. The child returns to - completely normal health between vomiting episodes. Children are diagnosed based on their - specific vomiting pattern and a lack of positive findings on laboratory testing.
GENDER: Both
MINIMUM AGE: N/A
MAXIMUM AGE: 21 Years
LOCATION

Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. Milwaukee. Wisconsin. 53226. United States. Recruiting. B Li, MD. 414-266-3690. bli@mcw.edu. B Li, MD. Principal Investigator.
FIRST RECEIVED

July 31, 2008
VERIFICATION DATE

January 2010
LAST CHANGED

January 14, 2010

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Abstract

BRIEF SUMMARY The purpose of this study is to determine if there are genetic variations that can explain a genetic basis for cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), various phenotypes of CVS (e.g. menstrual, Sato, calendar-tied) and migraine headaches (e.g. with aura, without aura, hemiplegic migraine). This information will allow physicians to improve care for patients who have been diagnosed with this disease and to provide their parents with more complete information regarding the cause of this disease. This research is being done because many unanswered questions remain regarding children with CVS. STUDY DESIGN Time Perspective: Prospective OFFICIAL TITLE Genetic Analysis of Children With Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome and Migraines CONDITION Vomiting Syndrome Migraines PRIMARY OUTCOME Identify novel genes that contribute to the risk of CVS using genomewide association analysis approach. SECONDARY OUTCOME Perform genotype-phenotype correlations between genetic profiles and various phenotypes of CVS (e.g. menstrual, Sato, calendar-tied) and migraine headaches (e.g. with aura, without aura, hemiplegic migraine) ELIGIBILITY Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) may be the most severe recurrent vomiting disorder in - humans. CVS is characterized by a sudden onset of rapid-fire vomiting, usually beginning - in the early morning hours or upon wakening. It has a peak vomiting intensity of every - 5-10 minutes (6-12 emeses) and episodes last between 2 hours and 10 days. These episodes - of acute vomiting occur on average once every 2 to 4 weeks. The child returns to - completely normal health between vomiting episodes. Children are diagnosed based on their - specific vomiting pattern and a lack of positive findings on laboratory testing. GENDER: Both MINIMUM AGE: N/A MAXIMUM AGE: 21 Years LOCATION Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. Milwaukee. Wisconsin. 53226. United States. Recruiting. B Li, MD. 414-266-3690. bli@mcw.edu. B Li, MD. Principal Investigator. FIRST RECEIVED July 31, 2008 VERIFICATION DATE January 2010 LAST CHANGED January 14, 2010

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