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Where Land Meets Sea: Coastal Explorations of Landscape, Representation, and Spatial Experience by Anna Ryan (review)

Where Land Meets Sea: Coastal Explorations of Landscape, Representation, and Spatial Experience... the Catholic civil rights movement was "nothing more than a thinly disguised coalition of Irish Republicans, Communists, and the Roman Catholic Church . . . [which] threatened the constitutional status of Northern Ireland and the existence of Bible Protestantism in Ulster." This shared fear, argues Jordan, transformed Paisley's relationship with American militants "from a theological union into a broader Christian-political crusade." Part 3 offers an overview of Paisley's career since 1969 from fundamentalist crusader to savvy politician. Jordan's book has a strong narrative drive as it takes the reader through Ian Paisley's career from the 1940s to the present. In so doing, Jordan unearths some funny anecdotes. In October 1964, for example, Paisley sent a cable to U Thant, secretary-general of the United Nations, to complain when Pope Paul VI flew over Northern Ireland airspace (his flight had been diverted due to bad weather). In the end, however, the force of this book's narrative also dilutes the book's overall argument. The central thesis seems to offer a theological explanation for Paisley's shift from "premillennial crusader" to "amillennial politician." Premillennialists, Jordan explains in the book's introduction, seek to hasten the Second Coming of Jesus by fighting apostasy tooth-and-nail and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Hibernia Review Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Where Land Meets Sea: Coastal Explorations of Landscape, Representation, and Spatial Experience by Anna Ryan (review)

New Hibernia Review , Volume 18 (1) – Mar 15, 2014

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Publisher
Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of St. Thomas.
ISSN
1534-5815
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the Catholic civil rights movement was "nothing more than a thinly disguised coalition of Irish Republicans, Communists, and the Roman Catholic Church . . . [which] threatened the constitutional status of Northern Ireland and the existence of Bible Protestantism in Ulster." This shared fear, argues Jordan, transformed Paisley's relationship with American militants "from a theological union into a broader Christian-political crusade." Part 3 offers an overview of Paisley's career since 1969 from fundamentalist crusader to savvy politician. Jordan's book has a strong narrative drive as it takes the reader through Ian Paisley's career from the 1940s to the present. In so doing, Jordan unearths some funny anecdotes. In October 1964, for example, Paisley sent a cable to U Thant, secretary-general of the United Nations, to complain when Pope Paul VI flew over Northern Ireland airspace (his flight had been diverted due to bad weather). In the end, however, the force of this book's narrative also dilutes the book's overall argument. The central thesis seems to offer a theological explanation for Paisley's shift from "premillennial crusader" to "amillennial politician." Premillennialists, Jordan explains in the book's introduction, seek to hasten the Second Coming of Jesus by fighting apostasy tooth-and-nail and

Journal

New Hibernia ReviewCenter for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Published: Mar 15, 2014

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