Waiting for a Place: At Gravedigger’s Pub

Waiting for a Place: At Gravedigger’s Pub Jeffrey A. Tolbert You can love a place and still feel overwhelmed by its strangeness, by its unlikeness to your own place. More than a decade ago I was an undergraduate studying abroad in Ireland, with little understanding of where I found myself and no appreciation for what a significant presence it would become in my own life. But I spent the next decade trying to return. Ireland became somewhat like a distant family member, a strange aunt whom I enjoy visiting but never quite understand. In "Genius Fabulae: The Irish Sense of Place," Patrick Sheeran wrote, "Death and destruction are linked to memory and place in Ireland by a deathless chain of names." For Sheeran, place implies death, an association made explicit by centuries of Irish tradition. Unnecessarily grim, perhaps, but there is truth in this claim. I lived in Dublin for a few months while doing research for my dissertation, and certainly, death is a presence in the city, with its bus tours celebrating sites of the Easter Rising, its bullet-ridden statues, and the massive Glasnevin Cemetery. But Sheeran's view--coming from the far side of the Celtic Tiger-- obscures decades of human living that, by definition, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Hibernia Review Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Waiting for a Place: At Gravedigger’s Pub

New Hibernia Review, Volume 20 (2) – Jul 29, 2016

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Publisher
Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of St. Thomas.
ISSN
1534-5815
Publisher site
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Abstract

Jeffrey A. Tolbert You can love a place and still feel overwhelmed by its strangeness, by its unlikeness to your own place. More than a decade ago I was an undergraduate studying abroad in Ireland, with little understanding of where I found myself and no appreciation for what a significant presence it would become in my own life. But I spent the next decade trying to return. Ireland became somewhat like a distant family member, a strange aunt whom I enjoy visiting but never quite understand. In "Genius Fabulae: The Irish Sense of Place," Patrick Sheeran wrote, "Death and destruction are linked to memory and place in Ireland by a deathless chain of names." For Sheeran, place implies death, an association made explicit by centuries of Irish tradition. Unnecessarily grim, perhaps, but there is truth in this claim. I lived in Dublin for a few months while doing research for my dissertation, and certainly, death is a presence in the city, with its bus tours celebrating sites of the Easter Rising, its bullet-ridden statues, and the massive Glasnevin Cemetery. But Sheeran's view--coming from the far side of the Celtic Tiger-- obscures decades of human living that, by definition,

Journal

New Hibernia ReviewCenter for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Published: Jul 29, 2016

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