The Great Irish Famine: Visual and Material Culture ed. by Marguérite Corporaal, Oona Frawley, and Emily Mark-FitzGerald (review)

The Great Irish Famine: Visual and Material Culture ed. by Marguérite Corporaal, Oona Frawley,... Léirmheasanna: Reviews regular losses, the turbulent politics of the island and of the wider world dur- ing the revolutionary and Napoleonic eras. In general, the Spanish were to be preferred to the French, whether locally or farther afield. What appears most directly and consistently in the correspondence is his concern for his family: his creole wife and several daughters. No less than the male members of the Black affinity, the women had mobile lives. One was dispatched to stay with an uncle and aunt in Ulster; another was sent to New York. A third, having married an army officer originally from the north of Ireland, moved oen. ft This collection differs from others that have been published in the last cou - ple of decades. The documents are not from letter books kept for business pur - poses, such as that of Greg and Cunningham in New York and Belfast, edited by o Th mas M. Truxes (2001), another of the Cork merchant Richard Hare between 1771 and 1772, edited by James O’Shea (2013), and the Bordeaux-Dublin Letters, 1757 (2013). John Black’s story, fragmentary as it is, can be added to the accounts of others of his kindred and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Hibernia Review Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

The Great Irish Famine: Visual and Material Culture ed. by Marguérite Corporaal, Oona Frawley, and Emily Mark-FitzGerald (review)

New Hibernia Review, Volume 23 (4) – Mar 4, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/center-for-irish-studies-at-the-university-of-st-thomas/the-great-irish-famine-visual-and-material-culture-ed-by-margu-rite-0sbpy0D4Uy
Publisher
Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas
Copyright
Copyright © The University of St. Thomas.
ISSN
1534-5815

Abstract

Léirmheasanna: Reviews regular losses, the turbulent politics of the island and of the wider world dur- ing the revolutionary and Napoleonic eras. In general, the Spanish were to be preferred to the French, whether locally or farther afield. What appears most directly and consistently in the correspondence is his concern for his family: his creole wife and several daughters. No less than the male members of the Black affinity, the women had mobile lives. One was dispatched to stay with an uncle and aunt in Ulster; another was sent to New York. A third, having married an army officer originally from the north of Ireland, moved oen. ft This collection differs from others that have been published in the last cou - ple of decades. The documents are not from letter books kept for business pur - poses, such as that of Greg and Cunningham in New York and Belfast, edited by o Th mas M. Truxes (2001), another of the Cork merchant Richard Hare between 1771 and 1772, edited by James O’Shea (2013), and the Bordeaux-Dublin Letters, 1757 (2013). John Black’s story, fragmentary as it is, can be added to the accounts of others of his kindred and

Journal

New Hibernia ReviewCenter for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Published: Mar 4, 2020

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off