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"No Hope for Him Unless He Can Be Got Out of the Country": Disabled Irish Republicans in America, 1922-1935

"No Hope for Him Unless He Can Be Got Out of the Country": Disabled Irish Republicans in America,... Gavin Wilk During the Irish Civil War, life for an Irish Republican Army member could be hazardous. Second Kerry Brigade member Jeremiah Murphy's account of his time as an IRA guerrilla fighter during late 1922 and early 1923 portrays the hardships that republicans faced. Murphy recalled that he and his battalion members struggled to find food, oftentimes slept rough, and contended with an overpowering Irish Free State army.1 Although he fully believed that republicans were "resolute men . . . hardened by the gains and defeats . . . and were not easily intimidated," Murphy conceded that "their nerves and physical endurance could not last indefinitely." Some of his fellow IRA members subsequently "became ill from stomach and lung ailments."2 If captured and placed in prison, conditions could become worse. Tipperary IRA volunteer Michael Flannery, detained in 1922 by Irish Free State troops, remembered the dampness in his cell at Mountjoy Prison.3 After awaking each morning, Flannery's standard routine included drying out his mattress. The bedding became so waterlogged that an oat grain, embedded in the fabric actually started to sprout. Prisoner hunger strikes also exacerbated the difficult conditions. The physical effects of malnourishment as described by IRA http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Hibernia Review Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

"No Hope for Him Unless He Can Be Got Out of the Country": Disabled Irish Republicans in America, 1922-1935

New Hibernia Review , Volume 18 (1) – Mar 15, 2014

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Publisher
Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of St. Thomas.
ISSN
1534-5815
Publisher site
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Abstract

Gavin Wilk During the Irish Civil War, life for an Irish Republican Army member could be hazardous. Second Kerry Brigade member Jeremiah Murphy's account of his time as an IRA guerrilla fighter during late 1922 and early 1923 portrays the hardships that republicans faced. Murphy recalled that he and his battalion members struggled to find food, oftentimes slept rough, and contended with an overpowering Irish Free State army.1 Although he fully believed that republicans were "resolute men . . . hardened by the gains and defeats . . . and were not easily intimidated," Murphy conceded that "their nerves and physical endurance could not last indefinitely." Some of his fellow IRA members subsequently "became ill from stomach and lung ailments."2 If captured and placed in prison, conditions could become worse. Tipperary IRA volunteer Michael Flannery, detained in 1922 by Irish Free State troops, remembered the dampness in his cell at Mountjoy Prison.3 After awaking each morning, Flannery's standard routine included drying out his mattress. The bedding became so waterlogged that an oat grain, embedded in the fabric actually started to sprout. Prisoner hunger strikes also exacerbated the difficult conditions. The physical effects of malnourishment as described by IRA

Journal

New Hibernia ReviewCenter for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Published: Mar 15, 2014

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