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Nótaí na nEagarthóirí: Editors' Notes

Nótaí na nEagarthóirí: Editors' Notes Nótaí na nEagarthóirí: Kerry Hardie, the recipient of the Lawrence O'Shaughnessy Award for Poetry presented by the University of St. Thomas in 2005, has written often and wisely of grief, most intimately in The Sky Didn't Fall (2003), a collection composed in the shadow of her father's death. Indeed, loss draws near in each of her seven books of poetry--but so, too, does endurance, and so does consolation. In our opening essay drawn from her forthcoming The Zebra Stood in the Night, Hardie leads us though a meditation on the ancient wisdom that in the midst of life we are in death. There is nothing abstract in how she writes of death: it is, she says, "like a smell that stays in the nostrils." And yet, as Hardie reflects, it is precisely that materiality that leads us back from grief: "We, in our turn, must slip back into the life from which they have absented themselves. It must close over us and reclaim us." Belfast might be seen as the very definition of a divided city, notwithstanding the gains that have followed the 1998 Peace Agreement. Today, many, even most, of the entrenched boundaries of its civic spaces http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Hibernia Review Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Nótaí na nEagarthóirí: Editors' Notes

New Hibernia Review , Volume 18 (1) – Mar 15, 2014

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Publisher
Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of St. Thomas.
ISSN
1534-5815
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nótaí na nEagarthóirí: Kerry Hardie, the recipient of the Lawrence O'Shaughnessy Award for Poetry presented by the University of St. Thomas in 2005, has written often and wisely of grief, most intimately in The Sky Didn't Fall (2003), a collection composed in the shadow of her father's death. Indeed, loss draws near in each of her seven books of poetry--but so, too, does endurance, and so does consolation. In our opening essay drawn from her forthcoming The Zebra Stood in the Night, Hardie leads us though a meditation on the ancient wisdom that in the midst of life we are in death. There is nothing abstract in how she writes of death: it is, she says, "like a smell that stays in the nostrils." And yet, as Hardie reflects, it is precisely that materiality that leads us back from grief: "We, in our turn, must slip back into the life from which they have absented themselves. It must close over us and reclaim us." Belfast might be seen as the very definition of a divided city, notwithstanding the gains that have followed the 1998 Peace Agreement. Today, many, even most, of the entrenched boundaries of its civic spaces

Journal

New Hibernia ReviewCenter for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Published: Mar 15, 2014

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