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Country Girl: A Memoir by Edna O'Brien (review)

Country Girl: A Memoir by Edna O'Brien (review) by three days of violence as Sinn Féin and the IGS, two unlikely allies, joined forces against the government muscle. Hanna's Modern Dublin: Urban Change and the Irish Past, 1957­1973 carefully examines the tensions in the residential areas of Dublin in the 1950s and 1960s that were threatened by commercial interests and in some ways aided by preservationist interests. In this compellingly written narrative, Hanna makes the conflict feel immediate and charged with the energy of its era. SHANNON SCOT T Country Girl: A Memoir, by Edna O'Brien, pp. 353. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2012. $27.99 (cloth); $16 (paper). Love her or hate her, at age eighty-four, Edna O'Brien reigns as the grand dame of Irish literature. With twenty-one works of fiction plus her nonfiction and drama, she has demonstrated a prolific staying power. Her public readings still mesmerize audiences. Her haunting voice and metaphoric power can silence an auditorium. But she has paid a heavy price for success. Famously, the sexual details of her earlier novels incited book burnings in her hometown--though those details hardly seem shocking now; quite tame, actually. Initially shunned and persecuted by the Irish public for years, she has nonetheless earned http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Hibernia Review Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Country Girl: A Memoir by Edna O'Brien (review)

New Hibernia Review , Volume 18 (1) – Mar 15, 2014

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Publisher
Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of St. Thomas.
ISSN
1534-5815
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

by three days of violence as Sinn Féin and the IGS, two unlikely allies, joined forces against the government muscle. Hanna's Modern Dublin: Urban Change and the Irish Past, 1957­1973 carefully examines the tensions in the residential areas of Dublin in the 1950s and 1960s that were threatened by commercial interests and in some ways aided by preservationist interests. In this compellingly written narrative, Hanna makes the conflict feel immediate and charged with the energy of its era. SHANNON SCOT T Country Girl: A Memoir, by Edna O'Brien, pp. 353. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2012. $27.99 (cloth); $16 (paper). Love her or hate her, at age eighty-four, Edna O'Brien reigns as the grand dame of Irish literature. With twenty-one works of fiction plus her nonfiction and drama, she has demonstrated a prolific staying power. Her public readings still mesmerize audiences. Her haunting voice and metaphoric power can silence an auditorium. But she has paid a heavy price for success. Famously, the sexual details of her earlier novels incited book burnings in her hometown--though those details hardly seem shocking now; quite tame, actually. Initially shunned and persecuted by the Irish public for years, she has nonetheless earned

Journal

New Hibernia ReviewCenter for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Published: Mar 15, 2014

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