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Competing Claims of Family and Nation: Introducing The Troubled House

Competing Claims of Family and Nation: Introducing The Troubled House Radharc ar gCúl: A Backward Glance Karen Steele This issue's "Radharc ar gGul-The Backward Glance" feature highlights the little-known and remarkable (1938) by Rosamond Jacob. For students and scholars of Ireland's revolutionary years, The Troubled House provides a bracing perspective on the competing claims of family and nation, two institutions that--by Eamon de Valéra's reckoning--worked in concert to establish Ireland's independence. Not simply a novel about the nationalist struggle written by a woman, The Troubled House represents distinctly different female (and male) responses to war. These range from a mother who cannot be confused with Mother Ireland, to a New Woman painter who plays with men but lives for her art, to a pacifist republican who eschews violence but temporarily enlists with the IRA. Influenced by Freudian theories about the family, Jacob explores such complicated familial dynamics as sibling love and rivalry, surrogate mothers and daughters, and Oedipal sons competing with their father. Dynamically plotted, the novel vividly captures significant events during the Anglo-Irish War to engage with competing views about the legitimacy of violence to achieve a political end. It even anticipates a new current in literary criticism, Animal Studies, as Jacob's novel is filled with evocative http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Hibernia Review Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Competing Claims of Family and Nation: Introducing The Troubled House

New Hibernia Review , Volume 15 (4) – Apr 6, 2011

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Publisher
Center for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of St. Thomas.
ISSN
1534-5815
Publisher site
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Abstract

Radharc ar gCúl: A Backward Glance Karen Steele This issue's "Radharc ar gGul-The Backward Glance" feature highlights the little-known and remarkable (1938) by Rosamond Jacob. For students and scholars of Ireland's revolutionary years, The Troubled House provides a bracing perspective on the competing claims of family and nation, two institutions that--by Eamon de Valéra's reckoning--worked in concert to establish Ireland's independence. Not simply a novel about the nationalist struggle written by a woman, The Troubled House represents distinctly different female (and male) responses to war. These range from a mother who cannot be confused with Mother Ireland, to a New Woman painter who plays with men but lives for her art, to a pacifist republican who eschews violence but temporarily enlists with the IRA. Influenced by Freudian theories about the family, Jacob explores such complicated familial dynamics as sibling love and rivalry, surrogate mothers and daughters, and Oedipal sons competing with their father. Dynamically plotted, the novel vividly captures significant events during the Anglo-Irish War to engage with competing views about the legitimacy of violence to achieve a political end. It even anticipates a new current in literary criticism, Animal Studies, as Jacob's novel is filled with evocative

Journal

New Hibernia ReviewCenter for Irish Studies at the University of St. Thomas

Published: Apr 6, 2011

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