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Book Review

Book Review This book is the tale of an adventure in the Southern Ocean and on its islands in the summer of 2016–2017, on a unique Antarctic circumnavigation. Much of it is about oceanography. Studying the ocean is like studying outer space - much of it being done remotely using elaborate and robust instruments, in this case lowered from the surface rather than being sent aloft. It is expensive, high risk, and often exceedingly uncomfortable - even dangerous, when storms hit, as they often do in the wild reaches of the Southern Ocean. It is also a slow process - research ships travel the world at about the speed one might pedal the average bicycle around Cambridge. Imagine riding your bike slowly across a heaving and pitching surface, with cold winds covering you with salty spray. Imagine having to abandon your goals in the face of severe weather - a soul-destroying experience when you may have journeyed far. But battling a harsh, uncompromising and hostile environment is grist to the mill for anyone engaged in pitting their wits against the elements to extract scientific information from Antarctica, the Southern Ocean, and the sub-Antarctic islands. As the expedition leader, David Walton of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Antarctic Science Cambridge University Press

Book Review

Antarctic Science , Volume 30 (4): 2 – May 21, 2018

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
© Antarctic Science Ltd 2018 
ISSN
0954-1020
eISSN
1365-2079
DOI
10.1017/S0954102018000184
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This book is the tale of an adventure in the Southern Ocean and on its islands in the summer of 2016–2017, on a unique Antarctic circumnavigation. Much of it is about oceanography. Studying the ocean is like studying outer space - much of it being done remotely using elaborate and robust instruments, in this case lowered from the surface rather than being sent aloft. It is expensive, high risk, and often exceedingly uncomfortable - even dangerous, when storms hit, as they often do in the wild reaches of the Southern Ocean. It is also a slow process - research ships travel the world at about the speed one might pedal the average bicycle around Cambridge. Imagine riding your bike slowly across a heaving and pitching surface, with cold winds covering you with salty spray. Imagine having to abandon your goals in the face of severe weather - a soul-destroying experience when you may have journeyed far. But battling a harsh, uncompromising and hostile environment is grist to the mill for anyone engaged in pitting their wits against the elements to extract scientific information from Antarctica, the Southern Ocean, and the sub-Antarctic islands. As the expedition leader, David Walton of

Journal

Antarctic ScienceCambridge University Press

Published: May 21, 2018

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