Slaying the Beast: The Case of Beatriz in Sor Juana's and Agustín de Salazar y Torres's La segunda Celestina

Slaying the Beast: The Case of Beatriz in Sor Juana's and Agustín de Salazar y Torres's La... Abstract: This essay examines female agency and deviance in two key scenes of La segunda Celestina as an act of monstrosity, a term that figures in this context as a transgression of gender codes. One of the three main female characters, Beatriz, is identified by her proclivity to hunt and her aversion to marry. While this may not be a new concept in comedia studies, the correlation between such an attitude and manifestations of monstrosity opens up the text to a reading that includes, but also transcends, the debate of authorial collaboration that has surrounded this text for a decade and a half. Through key discourses and descriptions, Beatriz exemplifies when monsters tend to emerge, how they are identified, and why soon thereafter they must be eliminated. Most importantly, Beatriz's actions demonstrate the modes by which monsters threaten social order. (BLG) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the Comediantes Bulletin of the Comediantes

Slaying the Beast: The Case of Beatriz in Sor Juana's and Agustín de Salazar y Torres's La segunda Celestina

Bulletin of the Comediantes, Volume 60 (1) – Jan 8, 2008

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Publisher
Bulletin of the Comediantes
Copyright
Copyright © Bulletin of the Comediantes
ISSN
1944-0928
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Abstract

Abstract: This essay examines female agency and deviance in two key scenes of La segunda Celestina as an act of monstrosity, a term that figures in this context as a transgression of gender codes. One of the three main female characters, Beatriz, is identified by her proclivity to hunt and her aversion to marry. While this may not be a new concept in comedia studies, the correlation between such an attitude and manifestations of monstrosity opens up the text to a reading that includes, but also transcends, the debate of authorial collaboration that has surrounded this text for a decade and a half. Through key discourses and descriptions, Beatriz exemplifies when monsters tend to emerge, how they are identified, and why soon thereafter they must be eliminated. Most importantly, Beatriz's actions demonstrate the modes by which monsters threaten social order. (BLG)

Journal

Bulletin of the ComediantesBulletin of the Comediantes

Published: Jan 8, 2008

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