Renaissance Drama in England and Spain: Topical Allusion and History (review)

Renaissance Drama in England and Spain: Topical Allusion and History (review) Reviews157 assume that Schiller's Mary Stuart was, through the medium of Lebrun's French adaptation 1830) a principal source of Breton's work. But Cañizares' drama, which continued to be performed with noteworthy regularity throughout the eighteenth century in Spain, was almost certainly also used by Bretón de los Herreros. Some of the similarities which caused Professor Paulson to connect Breton's work with the drama of Schiller might be explained by the fact that Bretón was influenced by Cañizares. The latter's inferior play resembles Schiller's masterpiece in certain respects, because both dramatists apparently utilized a common source: Boursault's Marie Stuard. Although Schiller's tragedy differs markedly from the three other dramas studied, in that it is not a work from Romance literature, one hesitates to criticize its inclusion. For Schiller's Maria Stuart is indisputably the most outstanding dramatization composed to date ofthat queen's tragic history. The fact is, however, that Paulson, as he himself admits, adds little to the knowledge and under- standing of Schiller's drama with which specialists in German drama have already supplied us. More surprisingly, despite his assurances that he has dedicated more space to Diamante and Boursault than to Schiller, his analyses of La reina María Estuarda http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the Comediantes Bulletin of the Comediantes

Renaissance Drama in England and Spain: Topical Allusion and History (review)

Bulletin of the Comediantes, Volume 42 (1) – Jan 8, 1990

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Publisher
Bulletin of the Comediantes
Copyright
Copyright © Bulletin of the Comediantes
ISSN
1944-0928
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Abstract

Reviews157 assume that Schiller's Mary Stuart was, through the medium of Lebrun's French adaptation 1830) a principal source of Breton's work. But Cañizares' drama, which continued to be performed with noteworthy regularity throughout the eighteenth century in Spain, was almost certainly also used by Bretón de los Herreros. Some of the similarities which caused Professor Paulson to connect Breton's work with the drama of Schiller might be explained by the fact that Bretón was influenced by Cañizares. The latter's inferior play resembles Schiller's masterpiece in certain respects, because both dramatists apparently utilized a common source: Boursault's Marie Stuard. Although Schiller's tragedy differs markedly from the three other dramas studied, in that it is not a work from Romance literature, one hesitates to criticize its inclusion. For Schiller's Maria Stuart is indisputably the most outstanding dramatization composed to date ofthat queen's tragic history. The fact is, however, that Paulson, as he himself admits, adds little to the knowledge and under- standing of Schiller's drama with which specialists in German drama have already supplied us. More surprisingly, despite his assurances that he has dedicated more space to Diamante and Boursault than to Schiller, his analyses of La reina María Estuarda

Journal

Bulletin of the ComediantesBulletin of the Comediantes

Published: Jan 8, 1990

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