WITTGENSTEIN'S NOSE

WITTGENSTEIN'S NOSE WITIGENSTEIN'S NOSE Avrum STROLL University of California, San Diego In a furious moment, Wittgenstein once complained that Carnap had no no se for philosophy. Whether he was right or not is perhaps open to question. But there is no doubt that Wittgenstein had such a nose, a sense of the uniqueness of philosophical questions and puzzles. Wittgenstein said about philosophical inquiry: "We feel as ifwe had to repair a torn spider's web with our fingers", (P.l., 106). "These are, of course, not empirical problems" , he teIls uso "They are solved, rather , by looking into the workings of our language, and that in such a way as to make us recognize those workings: despite an urge to misunderstand them." (P.L, 109). We find in his writings, from the Tractatus through On Certainty, a continuum stressing the autonomy of philosophy, and exhibiting three levels of sensitivity: 1) The recognition that "traditional" philosophical problems, such as the Other Minds problem or the Free Will problem, are not straightforwardly empirical, and thus are not resolvable by science, 2) the awareness that some deviation from ordinary discourse is present in all such problems, 3) and, most importantly for our purposes here, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Grazer Philosophische Studien Brill

WITTGENSTEIN'S NOSE

Grazer Philosophische Studien, Volume 33 (1): 395 – Aug 13, 1989

WITTGENSTEIN'S NOSE


WITIGENSTEIN'S NOSE Avrum STROLL University of California, San Diego In a furious moment, Wittgenstein once complained that Carnap had no no se for philosophy. Whether he was right or not is perhaps open to question. But there is no doubt that Wittgenstein had such a nose, a sense of the uniqueness of philosophical questions and puzzles. Wittgenstein said about philosophical inquiry: "We feel as ifwe had to repair a torn spider's web with our fingers", (P.l., 106). "These are, of course, not empirical problems" , he teIls uso "They are solved, rather , by looking into the workings of our language, and that in such a way as to make us recognize those workings: despite an urge to misunderstand them." (P.L, 109). We find in his writings, from the Tractatus through On Certainty, a continuum stressing the autonomy of philosophy, and exhibiting three levels of sensitivity: 1) The recognition that "traditional" philosophical problems, such as the Other Minds problem or the Free Will problem, are not straightforwardly empirical, and thus are not resolvable by science, 2) the awareness that some deviation from ordinary discourse is present in all such problems, 3) and, most importantly for our purposes here, that in many problems which seem to be empirical or scientific there are philosophical intrusions which are not gene rally recognized to be such and whichjam up the works in all sorts of complicated ways. In particular, they hinder or even prevent these problems from being solved by the simple adducing of facts. F or this volume, dedicated as it is to Wittgenstein, I would like to examine a contemporary problem in the theory of vision that exhibits the features I have just mentioned. This is the problem of whether we see the world directly or indirectly. There are proponents on both sides of the issue who adduce what they take to be empirical findings in support of their views. But as we shall see, the key issues turn...
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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 1989 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0165-9227
eISSN
1875-6735
D.O.I.
10.1163/18756735-90000406
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

WITIGENSTEIN'S NOSE Avrum STROLL University of California, San Diego In a furious moment, Wittgenstein once complained that Carnap had no no se for philosophy. Whether he was right or not is perhaps open to question. But there is no doubt that Wittgenstein had such a nose, a sense of the uniqueness of philosophical questions and puzzles. Wittgenstein said about philosophical inquiry: "We feel as ifwe had to repair a torn spider's web with our fingers", (P.l., 106). "These are, of course, not empirical problems" , he teIls uso "They are solved, rather , by looking into the workings of our language, and that in such a way as to make us recognize those workings: despite an urge to misunderstand them." (P.L, 109). We find in his writings, from the Tractatus through On Certainty, a continuum stressing the autonomy of philosophy, and exhibiting three levels of sensitivity: 1) The recognition that "traditional" philosophical problems, such as the Other Minds problem or the Free Will problem, are not straightforwardly empirical, and thus are not resolvable by science, 2) the awareness that some deviation from ordinary discourse is present in all such problems, 3) and, most importantly for our purposes here,

Journal

Grazer Philosophische StudienBrill

Published: Aug 13, 1989

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