William Edward Brown. A History of Seventeenth Century Russian Literature. Ann Arbor, Mich.: Ardis, 1980. 182 pp. Cloth $20.00; Paper $9.50.

William Edward Brown. A History of Seventeenth Century Russian Literature. Ann Arbor, Mich.:... of its sounds. On pages 128-29 he states: "Words, interlaced (or merely drawn together) by their sounds, approach each other and are interlaced, at least partly, by their meanings as w e l l . . . . Poetical language removes itself, both lexically and syntactically, from every- day speech. It returns to lantuage its original ... nature. It returns to words their mean- ings, which precede (although outside o f time) their individual concrete meanings, condi- tioned by context. In poetical language, these meanings are represented by various sounds; this explains why the sounds themselves take on meaning . . . . Poetical language can ne- ver be satisfied with mere denotation (oboznacheniem). In this respect it is related to music, and thus creates its own music." Poetry, he believes, is "another music" (p. 164) because it "is the music o f language, expressing the music of the senses in its . . . invariab- ly meaningful sounds" (p. 86). One questions the validity o f such statements. His lengthy discussion about music in poetry is n o t terribly convincing. Actually, his most tenable statement is found in an appendix: " O f course, music and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian-American Slavic Studies Brill

William Edward Brown. A History of Seventeenth Century Russian Literature. Ann Arbor, Mich.: Ardis, 1980. 182 pp. Cloth $20.00; Paper $9.50.

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1982 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0090-8290
eISSN
2210-2396
D.O.I.
10.1163/221023982X00650
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

of its sounds. On pages 128-29 he states: "Words, interlaced (or merely drawn together) by their sounds, approach each other and are interlaced, at least partly, by their meanings as w e l l . . . . Poetical language removes itself, both lexically and syntactically, from every- day speech. It returns to lantuage its original ... nature. It returns to words their mean- ings, which precede (although outside o f time) their individual concrete meanings, condi- tioned by context. In poetical language, these meanings are represented by various sounds; this explains why the sounds themselves take on meaning . . . . Poetical language can ne- ver be satisfied with mere denotation (oboznacheniem). In this respect it is related to music, and thus creates its own music." Poetry, he believes, is "another music" (p. 164) because it "is the music o f language, expressing the music of the senses in its . . . invariab- ly meaningful sounds" (p. 86). One questions the validity o f such statements. His lengthy discussion about music in poetry is n o t terribly convincing. Actually, his most tenable statement is found in an appendix: " O f course, music and

Journal

Canadian-American Slavic StudiesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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