Why Miletus? Chariton’s Choice of Setting and Xenophon’s Anabasis

Why Miletus? Chariton’s Choice of Setting and Xenophon’s Anabasis In Callirhoe 1.11.7 Theron announces to his fellow tomb-robbers that, because Athens is not a suitable place to sell the captive heroine into slavery, they will make for Ionia. ‘Yes’, he explains to them, ‘wealth fit for a king floods down into it from Asia and its people love luxury and mind their own business. And I expect we’ll be able to make contact with some of the local luminaries.’ 1) When they actually set sail in the next sentence, our narrator tells us they ‘sailed straight for Miletus’ (1.11.8 ἔπλεον εὐθὺ Μιλήτου). Why Miletus? What makes it and not some other Ionian city the obvious choice? Would not any of them of substantial size have served? Some answers have been suggested or suggest themselves. The most attractive of these have been rooted in Chariton’s origin in Aphrodisias. Jones (1992a, 162), for instance, thought that Chariton chose Miletus as a substitute for his own city, the inclusion of which would have been “une grave confusion” in a work set long before its foundation. This personal connection is strengthened if we believe, as Plepelits did (1976, 3), that “mit der Topographie von Milet war der Autor wohlvertraut”. Ruiz-Montero added http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mnemosyne Brill

Why Miletus? Chariton’s Choice of Setting and Xenophon’s Anabasis

Mnemosyne , Volume 65 (2): 300 – Jan 1, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/why-miletus-chariton-s-choice-of-setting-and-xenophon-s-anabasis-jBkeJEmlkG
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Miscellanea
ISSN
0026-7074
eISSN
1568-525X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852512X585197
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Callirhoe 1.11.7 Theron announces to his fellow tomb-robbers that, because Athens is not a suitable place to sell the captive heroine into slavery, they will make for Ionia. ‘Yes’, he explains to them, ‘wealth fit for a king floods down into it from Asia and its people love luxury and mind their own business. And I expect we’ll be able to make contact with some of the local luminaries.’ 1) When they actually set sail in the next sentence, our narrator tells us they ‘sailed straight for Miletus’ (1.11.8 ἔπλεον εὐθὺ Μιλήτου). Why Miletus? What makes it and not some other Ionian city the obvious choice? Would not any of them of substantial size have served? Some answers have been suggested or suggest themselves. The most attractive of these have been rooted in Chariton’s origin in Aphrodisias. Jones (1992a, 162), for instance, thought that Chariton chose Miletus as a substitute for his own city, the inclusion of which would have been “une grave confusion” in a work set long before its foundation. This personal connection is strengthened if we believe, as Plepelits did (1976, 3), that “mit der Topographie von Milet war der Autor wohlvertraut”. Ruiz-Montero added

Journal

MnemosyneBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2012

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off