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Why Do Schools Fail? Dewey on Imagination

Why Do Schools Fail? Dewey on Imagination Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 3, No. 1 (June 2006), 145­163 Editions Rodopi © 2006 Many educators today think that the school's lessons and activities do not stimulate or engage students' imaginations. In order to alleviate this problem, they tend to use images in conjunction with, or sometimes rather than, words; they employ so-called imaginative or creative activities rather than chalk and talk. However, these principles and methods are based on somewhat misguided or trivial understanding of the importance of imagination in students' lives. Dewey's understanding of the relevance of imagination gives us a useful perspective to better understand where imaginative engagement becomes crucial in education. 1. Introduction A major cause of school's failure is that lessons and activities do not stimulate or engage some crucial aspects of students' imaginations. This observation may seem outdated or misplaced because, today, at various levels of educational discourse from casual discussions to administrative documents, people do claim that imagination is important for successful education; and many instructional programs do use a lot of imaginative materials and methods. Educators today tend to use images in conjunction with, or sometimes rather than, words; they employ so-called imaginative or creative activities rather than chalk and talk. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Why Do Schools Fail? Dewey on Imagination

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 3 (1): 145 – Apr 21, 2006

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2006 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000037
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 3, No. 1 (June 2006), 145­163 Editions Rodopi © 2006 Many educators today think that the school's lessons and activities do not stimulate or engage students' imaginations. In order to alleviate this problem, they tend to use images in conjunction with, or sometimes rather than, words; they employ so-called imaginative or creative activities rather than chalk and talk. However, these principles and methods are based on somewhat misguided or trivial understanding of the importance of imagination in students' lives. Dewey's understanding of the relevance of imagination gives us a useful perspective to better understand where imaginative engagement becomes crucial in education. 1. Introduction A major cause of school's failure is that lessons and activities do not stimulate or engage some crucial aspects of students' imaginations. This observation may seem outdated or misplaced because, today, at various levels of educational discourse from casual discussions to administrative documents, people do claim that imagination is important for successful education; and many instructional programs do use a lot of imaginative materials and methods. Educators today tend to use images in conjunction with, or sometimes rather than, words; they employ so-called imaginative or creative activities rather than chalk and talk.

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2006

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