Why Do Gezira Tenants Withhold Their Households' Labour?

Why Do Gezira Tenants Withhold Their Households' Labour? Why Do Gezira Tenants Withhold Their Households' Labour? ABBAS ABDELKARIM School of Development Studies University of East Anglia, Norwich, U. K. ABSTRACT The Gezira Scheme which was established during British Colonial rule in Sudan was often viewed as a 'model of development' where small producers (tenants) are incorporated into a large-scale project. The low contribution of the tenants' household labour in the Scheme's farm- ing was a matter which was not expected and which begged for explanation. Some officials and scholars seem to attribute this to the tenants 'negative attitudes' towards farm labour, an attitude caused by ideological norms, lifestyle and other factors. This paper attempts to situate the pro- blem in its socio-economic and historical context. After exposing different 'technical factors' that may affect the tenants' household labour input, it goes on to search for answers in the effects of the uneven and non-linear development of capitalism. It contends that factors of uncertainty and obstacles for development created by the institution itself, as well as factors related to the wider socio-economic formation, have made Gezira tenants, who are not an undifferentiated stratum, and their household members tendencious towards finding alternative ways of livelihood. SINCE ITS ESTABLISHMENT in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Asian and African Studies (in 2002 continued as African and Asian Studies) Brill

Why Do Gezira Tenants Withhold Their Households' Labour?

Journal of Asian and African Studies (in 2002 continued as African and Asian Studies) , Volume 20 (1-2): 72 – Jan 1, 1985

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1985 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0021-9096
eISSN
1568-5217
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852185X00063
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Why Do Gezira Tenants Withhold Their Households' Labour? ABBAS ABDELKARIM School of Development Studies University of East Anglia, Norwich, U. K. ABSTRACT The Gezira Scheme which was established during British Colonial rule in Sudan was often viewed as a 'model of development' where small producers (tenants) are incorporated into a large-scale project. The low contribution of the tenants' household labour in the Scheme's farm- ing was a matter which was not expected and which begged for explanation. Some officials and scholars seem to attribute this to the tenants 'negative attitudes' towards farm labour, an attitude caused by ideological norms, lifestyle and other factors. This paper attempts to situate the pro- blem in its socio-economic and historical context. After exposing different 'technical factors' that may affect the tenants' household labour input, it goes on to search for answers in the effects of the uneven and non-linear development of capitalism. It contends that factors of uncertainty and obstacles for development created by the institution itself, as well as factors related to the wider socio-economic formation, have made Gezira tenants, who are not an undifferentiated stratum, and their household members tendencious towards finding alternative ways of livelihood. SINCE ITS ESTABLISHMENT in

Journal

Journal of Asian and African Studies (in 2002 continued as African and Asian Studies)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1985

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