Who is sitting next to me? Relatedness between next neighbours in common lizards

Who is sitting next to me? Relatedness between next neighbours in common lizards Amphibia-Reptilia 29 (2008): 19-24 Who is sitting next to me? Relatedness between next neighbours in common lizards Sylvia Hofmann Abstract. Several lizard species have been shown to exhibit kin recognition, including green iguanas ( Iguana iguana ), three Australian Scincid species ( Egernia stokesii , E. striolata and Tiliqua rugosa ) and common lizards ( Lacerta vivipara ). Thus, observations of close neighboured individuals of the common lizard that consist of differently or same-aged individuals at a given site may generate speculation about the relatedness structure of such combinations and putative “social” patterns of this species. A total of 682 lizards were sampled from a population in a nature reserve near Leipzig, Germany. Relatedness statistics were calculated using five microsatellite DNA loci. The relatedness of individuals that were sighted or captured together was compared by grouping them on sex and age. The results showed that pairs of adults and juveniles were significantly more related than all other combinations, with adults showing the lowest mean values of relatedness, followed by a similar low level of relatedness between subadults. Most “pairs” were found in juveniles. Pairs of subadults and juveniles as well as of adults and juveniles consisted mainly of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Who is sitting next to me? Relatedness between next neighbours in common lizards

Amphibia-Reptilia, Volume 29 (1): 19 – Jan 1, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/who-is-sitting-next-to-me-relatedness-between-next-neighbours-in-emACF5xw8p
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
DOI
10.1163/156853808783431497
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Amphibia-Reptilia 29 (2008): 19-24 Who is sitting next to me? Relatedness between next neighbours in common lizards Sylvia Hofmann Abstract. Several lizard species have been shown to exhibit kin recognition, including green iguanas ( Iguana iguana ), three Australian Scincid species ( Egernia stokesii , E. striolata and Tiliqua rugosa ) and common lizards ( Lacerta vivipara ). Thus, observations of close neighboured individuals of the common lizard that consist of differently or same-aged individuals at a given site may generate speculation about the relatedness structure of such combinations and putative “social” patterns of this species. A total of 682 lizards were sampled from a population in a nature reserve near Leipzig, Germany. Relatedness statistics were calculated using five microsatellite DNA loci. The relatedness of individuals that were sighted or captured together was compared by grouping them on sex and age. The results showed that pairs of adults and juveniles were significantly more related than all other combinations, with adults showing the lowest mean values of relatedness, followed by a similar low level of relatedness between subadults. Most “pairs” were found in juveniles. Pairs of subadults and juveniles as well as of adults and juveniles consisted mainly of

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: LACERTA VIVIPARA; KIN RECOGNITION; RELATEDNESS; SPACING STRUCTURE

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off