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What Phenomenology Ought To Be

What Phenomenology Ought To Be Steven Crowell. Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger . Cambridge, uk : Cambridge University Press, 2013. 321 + xvi pp. Steven Crowell’s rich book is an eminent advance in the interpretation of Husserl and Heidegger, in thinking about the nature of phenomenology as a way of philosophical inquiry, and in accessing the contribution phenomenology can make to philosophy in general. Just as its predecessor Husserl, Heidegger, and the Space of Meaning (2001) has not stood uncontested—the review by Taylor Carman, for instance, is very critical 1 —Crowell’s new book on normativity is also likely to spur debate. But such debate should be most welcome, because it will serve to renew discussion on the project and prospect of phenomenology no less than it will address the intentions of its past proponents. Three interrelated claims characterize Crowell’s approach to phenomenology and his philosophical project as a whole: first, as indicated in the title of the earlier book, Crowell takes phenomenology to be a study not of consciousness and/or being but of meaning. Though it may be a divergence from their respective terminology, the philosophical problem Husserl and Heidegger are concerned with, so Crowell holds, is best described as the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

What Phenomenology Ought To Be

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 44 (2): 281 – Jul 31, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/15691640-12341289
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Steven Crowell. Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger . Cambridge, uk : Cambridge University Press, 2013. 321 + xvi pp. Steven Crowell’s rich book is an eminent advance in the interpretation of Husserl and Heidegger, in thinking about the nature of phenomenology as a way of philosophical inquiry, and in accessing the contribution phenomenology can make to philosophy in general. Just as its predecessor Husserl, Heidegger, and the Space of Meaning (2001) has not stood uncontested—the review by Taylor Carman, for instance, is very critical 1 —Crowell’s new book on normativity is also likely to spur debate. But such debate should be most welcome, because it will serve to renew discussion on the project and prospect of phenomenology no less than it will address the intentions of its past proponents. Three interrelated claims characterize Crowell’s approach to phenomenology and his philosophical project as a whole: first, as indicated in the title of the earlier book, Crowell takes phenomenology to be a study not of consciousness and/or being but of meaning. Though it may be a divergence from their respective terminology, the philosophical problem Husserl and Heidegger are concerned with, so Crowell holds, is best described as the

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jul 31, 2014

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