Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

What Difference Does Ius Inter Gentes Make? Changing Diplomatic Rights and Duties and the Modern European States-System

What Difference Does Ius Inter Gentes Make? Changing Diplomatic Rights and Duties and the Modern... <jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The legal status of diplomats underwent a dramatic change between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries as a consequence of a transformed European states-system. Its transformation is linked to ius inter gentes, a 'law between nations' whose emergence not only created a Europe of sovereign states but simultaneously affected the scope, definition and justification of rights and duties held by diplomatic representatives. It is generally acknowledged that diplomacy as an institution exists by virtue of rules that are embodied in the modern system of states and defined as 'international society' or the 'society of states'. What needs to be better understood is that diplomatic rights and duties are made possible by this framework of an international society, which has discernible historical and analytical boundaries, and that the relationship between such a framework and its diplomatic institutions is not contingent but logical.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Hague Journal of Diplomacy Brill

What Difference Does Ius Inter Gentes Make? Changing Diplomatic Rights and Duties and the Modern European States-System

The Hague Journal of Diplomacy , Volume 1 (3): 235 – Jan 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/what-difference-does-ius-inter-gentes-make-changing-diplomatic-rights-FWBhrvIdMc
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1871-1901
eISSN
1871-191X
DOI
10.1163/187119006X149562
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The legal status of diplomats underwent a dramatic change between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries as a consequence of a transformed European states-system. Its transformation is linked to ius inter gentes, a 'law between nations' whose emergence not only created a Europe of sovereign states but simultaneously affected the scope, definition and justification of rights and duties held by diplomatic representatives. It is generally acknowledged that diplomacy as an institution exists by virtue of rules that are embodied in the modern system of states and defined as 'international society' or the 'society of states'. What needs to be better understood is that diplomatic rights and duties are made possible by this framework of an international society, which has discernible historical and analytical boundaries, and that the relationship between such a framework and its diplomatic institutions is not contingent but logical.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

The Hague Journal of DiplomacyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY; DIPLOMATIC INSTITUTIONS; IUS INTER GENTES; EUROPEAN STATES-SYSTEM; DIPLOMATIC THEORY; IUS GENTIUM; RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF DIPLOMATS; INTERNATIONAL LAW

There are no references for this article.