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What Difference Does Culture Make in Multilateral Negotiations?

What Difference Does Culture Make in Multilateral Negotiations? Global Governance 2 (1996), 169-188 What Difference Does Culture Make in Multilateral Negotiations? @l Karen A. Mingst eJ Craig P. Warkentin he UN serves as a prominent forum for multilateral negotiations T among delegates from countries with different cultural traditions. Yet there has been surprisingly little systematic examination of whether culture affects these negotiations and, if so, how. One reason for the dearth of research is the fact that the term culture has so many definitions; accordingly, scholars essentially have been unable to agree on its conceptual parameters. Some consensus, however, has emerged around the notion that "culture is a set of shared and enduring meanings, values, and beliefs that characterize national, ethnic, or other groups and orient their behavior."l This definition eschews a deterministic understanding of culture, while acknowledging that culture has behavioral consequences. Moreover, this broad understanding allows culture to be conceptualized in terms of shared institutional perceptions as well as com­ mon national experience(s). Working from this point of reference, we explore a number of ques­ tions. Do delegates from particular cultural groups negotiate similarly? How do the cultural backgrounds of delegates affect their substantive posi­ tions? Does the effect of culture vary by issue area http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

What Difference Does Culture Make in Multilateral Negotiations?

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-002-02-90000003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 2 (1996), 169-188 What Difference Does Culture Make in Multilateral Negotiations? @l Karen A. Mingst eJ Craig P. Warkentin he UN serves as a prominent forum for multilateral negotiations T among delegates from countries with different cultural traditions. Yet there has been surprisingly little systematic examination of whether culture affects these negotiations and, if so, how. One reason for the dearth of research is the fact that the term culture has so many definitions; accordingly, scholars essentially have been unable to agree on its conceptual parameters. Some consensus, however, has emerged around the notion that "culture is a set of shared and enduring meanings, values, and beliefs that characterize national, ethnic, or other groups and orient their behavior."l This definition eschews a deterministic understanding of culture, while acknowledging that culture has behavioral consequences. Moreover, this broad understanding allows culture to be conceptualized in terms of shared institutional perceptions as well as com­ mon national experience(s). Working from this point of reference, we explore a number of ques­ tions. Do delegates from particular cultural groups negotiate similarly? How do the cultural backgrounds of delegates affect their substantive posi­ tions? Does the effect of culture vary by issue area

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Jul 19, 1996

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