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Weapons of Mass Destruction and the United Nations

Weapons of Mass Destruction and the United Nations Global Governance 10 (2004), 265–271 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Weapons of Mass Destruction and the United Nations Jessica Tuchman Mathews What Happened in Iraq? The Success Story of UN Inspections This is an extraordinarily important moment for the United Nations. Before attention is lost in the controversies over the war itself and in the challenges of its aftermath, the UN must capture, clarify, and publicize the record of international inspections in Iraq: for itself, for member governments, and for the public. Was the process encompassing the UN Special Commission (UNSCOM), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the UN Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) from 1991 to 2003 a success? Or was it the bumbling embarrassment, the “sham,” portrayed by top U.S. officials and still understood that way by the American public—and perhaps by the public elsewhere? The bottom line is that it was in fact a rather striking international success that stands out in the record of recent decades. However, it is a success studded with weaknesses that need to be understood and cor- rected and one that, because it is not yet recognized, is not fully real. Without a concerted analytical effort, the record of what actually hap- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01003001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 10 (2004), 265–271 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Weapons of Mass Destruction and the United Nations Jessica Tuchman Mathews What Happened in Iraq? The Success Story of UN Inspections This is an extraordinarily important moment for the United Nations. Before attention is lost in the controversies over the war itself and in the challenges of its aftermath, the UN must capture, clarify, and publicize the record of international inspections in Iraq: for itself, for member governments, and for the public. Was the process encompassing the UN Special Commission (UNSCOM), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the UN Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) from 1991 to 2003 a success? Or was it the bumbling embarrassment, the “sham,” portrayed by top U.S. officials and still understood that way by the American public—and perhaps by the public elsewhere? The bottom line is that it was in fact a rather striking international success that stands out in the record of recent decades. However, it is a success studded with weaknesses that need to be understood and cor- rected and one that, because it is not yet recognized, is not fully real. Without a concerted analytical effort, the record of what actually hap-

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2004

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