“We Feel Like the King and Queen”

“We Feel Like the King and Queen” International retirement migration (IRM) refers to the rapidly growing wave of financially independent individuals from diverse nations seeking affordable, comfortable retirement away from their home nation. The goal is to maximise personal resources to enjoy those last years. Bali Indonesia was ‘not fully tamed by colonialism until the twentieth century.’ In becoming part of Dutch Indonesia it had endured a ‘long and bloody struggle’ (Vickers, 2012; 18). Today, it can be argued, Bali is in effect being colonised again, this time not just by 4 million tourists annually, but by international retiree settlers. Bali’s warm climate, benign culture, and comparative affordability deliver the prospect for foreigners to upwardly mobilise to a quality of living inaccessible at home. Local government authorities and residents respond to this influx by finding ways to maximise benefit from this lucrative retiree market. The requirements of the settlers are prioritised for potential profit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Journal of Social Science Brill

“We Feel Like the King and Queen”

Asian Journal of Social Science, Volume 45 (3): 23 – Jan 1, 2017

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1568-4849
eISSN
1568-5314
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685314-04503003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International retirement migration (IRM) refers to the rapidly growing wave of financially independent individuals from diverse nations seeking affordable, comfortable retirement away from their home nation. The goal is to maximise personal resources to enjoy those last years. Bali Indonesia was ‘not fully tamed by colonialism until the twentieth century.’ In becoming part of Dutch Indonesia it had endured a ‘long and bloody struggle’ (Vickers, 2012; 18). Today, it can be argued, Bali is in effect being colonised again, this time not just by 4 million tourists annually, but by international retiree settlers. Bali’s warm climate, benign culture, and comparative affordability deliver the prospect for foreigners to upwardly mobilise to a quality of living inaccessible at home. Local government authorities and residents respond to this influx by finding ways to maximise benefit from this lucrative retiree market. The requirements of the settlers are prioritised for potential profit.

Journal

Asian Journal of Social ScienceBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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