Was Dust Their Food and Clay Their Bread? Grave Goods, the Mesopotamian Afterlife, and the Liminal Role of Inana/Ishtar

Was Dust Their Food and Clay Their Bread? Grave Goods, the Mesopotamian Afterlife, and the... © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 JANER 7.1 Also available online – www.brill.nl * I would like to extend much thanks and gratitude to Eckart Frahm, Paul- Alain Beaulieu, Irene Winter, Piotr Steinkeller, David Gordon Mitten, and C.C. Lamberg-Karlovsky for providing invaluable comments, criticism, and bibliographic suggestions on earlier drafts of this paper, as well as for many pro fi table discus- sions about Mesopotamian religion. In addition, my thanks go to JANER’s anony- mous reviewers for many helpful comments, and to Ms. Marie-Lan Nguyen for allowing me to use her photograph of the frit “mask” from Mari. As always, responsibility for all opinions and any errors remains with me. I would also like to thank the Harvard College Research Program for a generous grant that enabled me to begin research on this topic. WAS DUST THEIR FOOD AND CLAY THEIR BREAD? GRAVE GOODS, THE MESOPOTAMIAN AFTERLIFE, AND THE LIMINAL ROLE OF INANA/ISHTAR* CAITLÍN E. BARRETT Abstract Many literary texts portray the Mesopotamian netherworld as unrelievedly bleak, yet the archaeological evidence of grave goods suggests that there may also have existed an alternative way of thinking about the afterlife. An analysis of the types of objects found in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions Brill

Was Dust Their Food and Clay Their Bread? Grave Goods, the Mesopotamian Afterlife, and the Liminal Role of Inana/Ishtar

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1569-2116
eISSN
1569-2124
DOI
10.1163/156921207781375123
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 JANER 7.1 Also available online – www.brill.nl * I would like to extend much thanks and gratitude to Eckart Frahm, Paul- Alain Beaulieu, Irene Winter, Piotr Steinkeller, David Gordon Mitten, and C.C. Lamberg-Karlovsky for providing invaluable comments, criticism, and bibliographic suggestions on earlier drafts of this paper, as well as for many pro fi table discus- sions about Mesopotamian religion. In addition, my thanks go to JANER’s anony- mous reviewers for many helpful comments, and to Ms. Marie-Lan Nguyen for allowing me to use her photograph of the frit “mask” from Mari. As always, responsibility for all opinions and any errors remains with me. I would also like to thank the Harvard College Research Program for a generous grant that enabled me to begin research on this topic. WAS DUST THEIR FOOD AND CLAY THEIR BREAD? GRAVE GOODS, THE MESOPOTAMIAN AFTERLIFE, AND THE LIMINAL ROLE OF INANA/ISHTAR* CAITLÍN E. BARRETT Abstract Many literary texts portray the Mesopotamian netherworld as unrelievedly bleak, yet the archaeological evidence of grave goods suggests that there may also have existed an alternative way of thinking about the afterlife. An analysis of the types of objects found in

Journal

Journal of Ancient Near Eastern ReligionsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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