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Was beweist das Anamnesisargument in Platons „Phaidon“?

Was beweist das Anamnesisargument in Platons „Phaidon“? Was beweist das Anamnesisargument in Platons „Phaidon“? Jörg Hardy, Freie Universität Berlin In this essay, I am offering a reinterpretation of the so-called argument from re- collection in the Phaedo by invoking the difference between knowing how to use predicats such as “equal” and making explicit the propositional content of such predicats. I argue that Socrates does not – in spite of his interlocutors’ expectations – aim at proving the pre-existence of immortal human souls. Socrates’ aim is clearly stated in the dialogues opening conversation. For Socrates, inquiring into the realm of Forms is the only way to overcome the contingencies of the physical world (65a–67a). Knowledge of Forms can be best understood as theoretical, scientific knowledge; such as the knowledge about the modus operandi of perception that is the upshot of the argument from recollection. This argument proves – really proves – that we, as human beings, possess the capacity of obtaining a priori knowledge, such as knowledge about exact equality on the basis of our perceptions. Given that capacity, it is also possible that our souls are immortal. 1 Der Auftakt: Sokrates’ Glück und die Sorge um die Seele In Platons „Phaidon“ verteidigt Sokrates folgende These: Wer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Philosophy and Logical Analysis Brill

Was beweist das Anamnesisargument in Platons „Phaidon“?

History of Philosophy and Logical Analysis , Volume 10 (1): 25 – Apr 5, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2666-4283
eISSN
2666-4275
DOI
10.30965/26664275-01001002
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Abstract

Was beweist das Anamnesisargument in Platons „Phaidon“? Jörg Hardy, Freie Universität Berlin In this essay, I am offering a reinterpretation of the so-called argument from re- collection in the Phaedo by invoking the difference between knowing how to use predicats such as “equal” and making explicit the propositional content of such predicats. I argue that Socrates does not – in spite of his interlocutors’ expectations – aim at proving the pre-existence of immortal human souls. Socrates’ aim is clearly stated in the dialogues opening conversation. For Socrates, inquiring into the realm of Forms is the only way to overcome the contingencies of the physical world (65a–67a). Knowledge of Forms can be best understood as theoretical, scientific knowledge; such as the knowledge about the modus operandi of perception that is the upshot of the argument from recollection. This argument proves – really proves – that we, as human beings, possess the capacity of obtaining a priori knowledge, such as knowledge about exact equality on the basis of our perceptions. Given that capacity, it is also possible that our souls are immortal. 1 Der Auftakt: Sokrates’ Glück und die Sorge um die Seele In Platons „Phaidon“ verteidigt Sokrates folgende These: Wer

Journal

History of Philosophy and Logical AnalysisBrill

Published: Apr 5, 2007

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