Use it, or lose it — The OSCE Moscow mechanism

Use it, or lose it — The OSCE Moscow mechanism Use it, or lose it — The OSCE Moscow mechanism Aaron Rhodes 1 One of the largest massacres of civilians in post-WW II history took place in Andijan, Uzbekistan in May 2005. It was followed by an intensification of the ongoing repression against human rights activity in Uzbekistan, and efforts by journalists and others to investigate and document the incident. The government’s tactics included concerted and sometimes violent efforts to discredit and mobilize public sentiment against civil society activists challenging the government’s ‘version of the events’. According to this ‘version of the events,’ the government bears no responsibility for the killing of civilians by security forces, deaths that the government blames on ‘terrorists and religious extremists.’ At the conclusion of the 2005 OSCE Human Dimension Implementation Meeting, four international human rights organizations, viz. Amnesty International, Federation Internationale des ligues des droits de l’Homme, the International League for Human Rights, and the International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights, addressed the gathered delegations and non-governmental organizations with a ‘Joint Appeal to the OSCE Participating States to Invoke the Moscow Mechanism with Respect to the Andijan Events’. The human rights organizations termed those events ‘a serious threat to the OSCE human http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Helsinki Monitor (in 2008 continued as Security and Human Rights) Brill

Use it, or lose it — The OSCE Moscow mechanism

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0925-0972
eISSN
1571-814X
D.O.I.
10.1163/157181405775080911
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Use it, or lose it — The OSCE Moscow mechanism Aaron Rhodes 1 One of the largest massacres of civilians in post-WW II history took place in Andijan, Uzbekistan in May 2005. It was followed by an intensification of the ongoing repression against human rights activity in Uzbekistan, and efforts by journalists and others to investigate and document the incident. The government’s tactics included concerted and sometimes violent efforts to discredit and mobilize public sentiment against civil society activists challenging the government’s ‘version of the events’. According to this ‘version of the events,’ the government bears no responsibility for the killing of civilians by security forces, deaths that the government blames on ‘terrorists and religious extremists.’ At the conclusion of the 2005 OSCE Human Dimension Implementation Meeting, four international human rights organizations, viz. Amnesty International, Federation Internationale des ligues des droits de l’Homme, the International League for Human Rights, and the International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights, addressed the gathered delegations and non-governmental organizations with a ‘Joint Appeal to the OSCE Participating States to Invoke the Moscow Mechanism with Respect to the Andijan Events’. The human rights organizations termed those events ‘a serious threat to the OSCE human

Journal

Helsinki Monitor (in 2008 continued as Security and Human Rights)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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