Understanding the Correspondences: Introduction to the Special Issue on Crossmodal Correspondences

Understanding the Correspondences: Introduction to the Special Issue on Crossmodal Correspondences Most humans will readily describe auditory pitch spatially, as either high or low (Pratt, 1930; Stumpf, 1883). Likewise, they agree that lemons are fast, while prunes are slow (Woods et al ., 2013), and they are certain that even though they have never seen one, an object called ‘takete’ will be spikier than one called ‘maluma’ (Köhler, 1929, 1947; see also Bremner et al ., 2013). These various crossings of the senses, which some want to call ‘natural associations’ or ‘metaphorical mappings’ (Evans and Treisman, 2010; Wagner et al ., 1981), are increasingly being bundled together under the heading of ‘crossmodal correspondences’, and seen as a hallmark of human cognition and perception (Deroy and Spence, 2013a; Marks, 1978, 1996; Parise and Spence, 2013; Spence, 2011). Over the years, crossmodal correspondences have been consistently found across features and dimensions from all sensory modalities. Some recent studies even appear to suggest that other animals (such as chimpanzees) might experience analogous phenomena (Ludwig et al ., 2011). While bearing some superficial similarities to synaesthesia (Cytowic, 1993; Simner and Hubbard, 2013), Deroy and Spence (2013a, in press) have stressed the important differences between these two empirical phenomena. Understanding the sensory correspondences is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Multisensory Research (continuation of Seeing & Perceiving from 2013) Brill

Understanding the Correspondences: Introduction to the Special Issue on Crossmodal Correspondences

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Articles
ISSN
2213-4794
eISSN
2213-4808
DOI
10.1163/22134808-00002517
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most humans will readily describe auditory pitch spatially, as either high or low (Pratt, 1930; Stumpf, 1883). Likewise, they agree that lemons are fast, while prunes are slow (Woods et al ., 2013), and they are certain that even though they have never seen one, an object called ‘takete’ will be spikier than one called ‘maluma’ (Köhler, 1929, 1947; see also Bremner et al ., 2013). These various crossings of the senses, which some want to call ‘natural associations’ or ‘metaphorical mappings’ (Evans and Treisman, 2010; Wagner et al ., 1981), are increasingly being bundled together under the heading of ‘crossmodal correspondences’, and seen as a hallmark of human cognition and perception (Deroy and Spence, 2013a; Marks, 1978, 1996; Parise and Spence, 2013; Spence, 2011). Over the years, crossmodal correspondences have been consistently found across features and dimensions from all sensory modalities. Some recent studies even appear to suggest that other animals (such as chimpanzees) might experience analogous phenomena (Ludwig et al ., 2011). While bearing some superficial similarities to synaesthesia (Cytowic, 1993; Simner and Hubbard, 2013), Deroy and Spence (2013a, in press) have stressed the important differences between these two empirical phenomena. Understanding the sensory correspondences is

Journal

Multisensory Research (continuation of Seeing & Perceiving from 2013)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1

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