Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

U.S. Unilateralism at the UN: Why Great Powers Do Not Make Great Multilateralists

U.S. Unilateralism at the UN: Why Great Powers Do Not Make Great Multilateralists Global Governance 6 (2000), 361–381 U.S. Unilateralism at the UN: Why Great Powers Do Not Make Great Multilateralists Steven Holloway he 1990s saw a renewed interest by U.S. scholars in multilateralism as an important institution in international affairs. These scholars T may have been sparked by former president George Bush’s call for a new world order in which the U.S. government was to be more recep- tive to universal aspiration, cooperative deterrence, and joint action against aggression. Thus, Robert Keohane and others rediscovered a U.S. com- mitment to multilateralism as a “practice of coordinating national policies in groups of three or more states.” It is fitting that Keohane’s article ap- peared in a Canadian journal devoted entirely to the subject because mul- tilateralism has long been a major theme in the study of Canadian foreign policy. One major addition to this literature in the 1990s was by Tom Keating. Indeed, the Canadian practice of multilateralism might well serve as a benchmark for judging U.S. commitment to it. There are, after all, grounds for doubting the constancy of the U.S. commitment to multilateralism. In negotiations leading to the 1997 land- mine treaty and the 1998 international criminal court treaty, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

U.S. Unilateralism at the UN: Why Great Powers Do Not Make Great Multilateralists

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/u-s-unilateralism-at-the-un-why-great-powers-do-not-make-great-G61snl0d0r
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-00603005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 6 (2000), 361–381 U.S. Unilateralism at the UN: Why Great Powers Do Not Make Great Multilateralists Steven Holloway he 1990s saw a renewed interest by U.S. scholars in multilateralism as an important institution in international affairs. These scholars T may have been sparked by former president George Bush’s call for a new world order in which the U.S. government was to be more recep- tive to universal aspiration, cooperative deterrence, and joint action against aggression. Thus, Robert Keohane and others rediscovered a U.S. com- mitment to multilateralism as a “practice of coordinating national policies in groups of three or more states.” It is fitting that Keohane’s article ap- peared in a Canadian journal devoted entirely to the subject because mul- tilateralism has long been a major theme in the study of Canadian foreign policy. One major addition to this literature in the 1990s was by Tom Keating. Indeed, the Canadian practice of multilateralism might well serve as a benchmark for judging U.S. commitment to it. There are, after all, grounds for doubting the constancy of the U.S. commitment to multilateralism. In negotiations leading to the 1997 land- mine treaty and the 1998 international criminal court treaty, the

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2000

There are no references for this article.