TRIANGULATION, CONTENT AND THE BASING RELATION

TRIANGULATION, CONTENT AND THE BASING RELATION Grazer Philosophische Studien 78 (2009), 231­250. TRIANGULATION, CONTENT AND THE BASING RELATION1 Hamid VAHID Analytic Philosophy Faculty (IPM), Tehran Summary It is widely believed that what distinguishes between a justifiable and a justified belief is the obtaining of an epistemic relation, the basing relation, whose nature and character has long been a controversial issue in epistemology. There are currently two major approaches to the problem of the basing relation, namely, the causal and doxastic theories. In this paper, after a brief survey of the field, I examine Alston's recent account of the basing relation, as input to psychologically realized functions, arguing that his way of identifying the functions in question presupposes what it seeks to establish as it merely replaces one kind of indeterminacy (with respect to the ground of a belief ) with another (regarding the content of belief outputs). To avoid this problem, I suggest a version of Alston's account within a broadly Davidsonian framework. A complete theory of justification is both an account of under what conditions a belief is justifiable (rational) as well as whether it is justified. A justifiable belief is one where an agent is said to have adequate grounds or evidence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Grazer Philosophische Studien Brill

TRIANGULATION, CONTENT AND THE BASING RELATION

Grazer Philosophische Studien, Volume 78 (1): 231 – Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2009 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0165-9227
eISSN
1875-6735
DOI
10.1163/9789042026056_011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Grazer Philosophische Studien 78 (2009), 231­250. TRIANGULATION, CONTENT AND THE BASING RELATION1 Hamid VAHID Analytic Philosophy Faculty (IPM), Tehran Summary It is widely believed that what distinguishes between a justifiable and a justified belief is the obtaining of an epistemic relation, the basing relation, whose nature and character has long been a controversial issue in epistemology. There are currently two major approaches to the problem of the basing relation, namely, the causal and doxastic theories. In this paper, after a brief survey of the field, I examine Alston's recent account of the basing relation, as input to psychologically realized functions, arguing that his way of identifying the functions in question presupposes what it seeks to establish as it merely replaces one kind of indeterminacy (with respect to the ground of a belief ) with another (regarding the content of belief outputs). To avoid this problem, I suggest a version of Alston's account within a broadly Davidsonian framework. A complete theory of justification is both an account of under what conditions a belief is justifiable (rational) as well as whether it is justified. A justifiable belief is one where an agent is said to have adequate grounds or evidence

Journal

Grazer Philosophische StudienBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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