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Transforming What We Know1

Transforming What We Know1 57 Transforming What We Know1 GRAEME NICHOLSON University of Toronto What is most striking in the recent history of hermeneutics is the way it has been applied in so many fields. Literary studies, for instance, once stood at some remove from the hermeneutical reflections of philosophers and theologians, but nowadays this distance has shrunk. The works of Wolfgang Iser2 and Hans Robert Jauss3 have taught many literary scholars to think hermeneutically, and not just in the German-speaking world. The current issue of the literary review Texte4 offers fifteen articles and a very extensive bibliography documenting the impact of hermeneutics upon literary studies in French, Italian, German and English. Work in the different theological disciplines continues apace. Most of it, naturally, proceeds in directions charted out by the theological com- munities themselves during their long history. But there are other works that display the direct imprint of philosophical studies in hermeneutics, notably the work of Anthony Thiselton,s or of hermeneutical and structural-linguistic approaches that were first developed in literary studies.6 Among philosophers there has been the continuing recovery of the works of ancient and modern thinkers following a more or less explicit hermeneutical method, and there has also been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Transforming What We Know1

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 16 (1): 57 – Jan 1, 1986

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1986 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916486X00040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

57 Transforming What We Know1 GRAEME NICHOLSON University of Toronto What is most striking in the recent history of hermeneutics is the way it has been applied in so many fields. Literary studies, for instance, once stood at some remove from the hermeneutical reflections of philosophers and theologians, but nowadays this distance has shrunk. The works of Wolfgang Iser2 and Hans Robert Jauss3 have taught many literary scholars to think hermeneutically, and not just in the German-speaking world. The current issue of the literary review Texte4 offers fifteen articles and a very extensive bibliography documenting the impact of hermeneutics upon literary studies in French, Italian, German and English. Work in the different theological disciplines continues apace. Most of it, naturally, proceeds in directions charted out by the theological com- munities themselves during their long history. But there are other works that display the direct imprint of philosophical studies in hermeneutics, notably the work of Anthony Thiselton,s or of hermeneutical and structural-linguistic approaches that were first developed in literary studies.6 Among philosophers there has been the continuing recovery of the works of ancient and modern thinkers following a more or less explicit hermeneutical method, and there has also been

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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