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Toward Rediscovering Sartre

Toward Rediscovering Sartre 219 Toward Rediscovering Sartre Thomas R. Flynn Sartre and Marxist Existentialism, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984 Thomas Flynn reopens worked-over ground when he takes up the question of Sartre's relation to Marxism. However, the path he chooses into this ground-the notion of collective responsibility-is novel and serves well the project of bringing out the key issues involved in any assessment of the relation of Sartre's existentialism to his "Marxism," and, additionally, manages to offer a certain interpretation of Sartre's project as a whole. Flynn divides his presentation into three parts. The first part examines the key existentialist notions of freedom and responsibility as developed in Being and Nothingness (BN). The development of Sartre's social theory from transitional works such as Anti-Semite and Jew and certain essays from Situations V through the Critique of Dialectical Reason (CDR) is laid out in part two, in which Flynn also pieces together what he believes to be a coherent theory of collective responsibility. In the third part, he judges Sartre's social theory to be " 'Marxist' existentialist," ' and expresses several reservations about its success. In building his case for the primacy of Sartre's existentialism, Flynn argues for a compatibility between http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Toward Rediscovering Sartre

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 16 (1): 219 – Jan 1, 1986

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1986 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916486X00158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

219 Toward Rediscovering Sartre Thomas R. Flynn Sartre and Marxist Existentialism, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984 Thomas Flynn reopens worked-over ground when he takes up the question of Sartre's relation to Marxism. However, the path he chooses into this ground-the notion of collective responsibility-is novel and serves well the project of bringing out the key issues involved in any assessment of the relation of Sartre's existentialism to his "Marxism," and, additionally, manages to offer a certain interpretation of Sartre's project as a whole. Flynn divides his presentation into three parts. The first part examines the key existentialist notions of freedom and responsibility as developed in Being and Nothingness (BN). The development of Sartre's social theory from transitional works such as Anti-Semite and Jew and certain essays from Situations V through the Critique of Dialectical Reason (CDR) is laid out in part two, in which Flynn also pieces together what he believes to be a coherent theory of collective responsibility. In the third part, he judges Sartre's social theory to be " 'Marxist' existentialist," ' and expresses several reservations about its success. In building his case for the primacy of Sartre's existentialism, Flynn argues for a compatibility between

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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