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Toward Inclusive Global Governance? Japanese Civil Society, the State, and G7/8 Summitry, 2000–2016

Toward Inclusive Global Governance? Japanese Civil Society, the State, and G7/8 Summitry, 2000–2016 Global Governance 24 (2018), 211–228 Toward Inclusive Global Governance? Japanese Civil Society, the State, and G7/8 Summitry, 2000–2016 Kamila Szczepanska Utilizing the examples of three G7/8 summits held in Japan in recent years— the 2000 Kyūshū-Okinawa summit, the 2008 Hokkaidō-Tōyako summit, and the 2016 Ise-Shima summit—I analyze in this article the extent to which the norm of inclusive approach to the participation of civil society in global governance processes has been embraced by subsequent Japanese governments. I pro- pose that the norm of civil society inclusion in global governance processes has not yet taken sufficient hold among Japanese ruling elites, and the extent and the conditions of civil society organization participation in the summits were dic- tated by the political philosophy of the given prime minister in power, resulting in an inconsistent and contradictory approach to nongovernmental actors. KEY- WORDS: Japanese civil society, G7/8 summitry, global governance. THE GROUP OF 7 OR GROUP OF 8 (G7/8) SUMMITRY HAS HISTORICALLY BEEN challenging for civil society actors, but since the mid-1990s the G7/8 states have indicated a greater openness to civil society organization (CSO) participation in the summitry process. In the case of Japan, the sole participant from Asia at the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Toward Inclusive Global Governance? Japanese Civil Society, the State, and G7/8 Summitry, 2000–2016

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02402004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 24 (2018), 211–228 Toward Inclusive Global Governance? Japanese Civil Society, the State, and G7/8 Summitry, 2000–2016 Kamila Szczepanska Utilizing the examples of three G7/8 summits held in Japan in recent years— the 2000 Kyūshū-Okinawa summit, the 2008 Hokkaidō-Tōyako summit, and the 2016 Ise-Shima summit—I analyze in this article the extent to which the norm of inclusive approach to the participation of civil society in global governance processes has been embraced by subsequent Japanese governments. I pro- pose that the norm of civil society inclusion in global governance processes has not yet taken sufficient hold among Japanese ruling elites, and the extent and the conditions of civil society organization participation in the summits were dic- tated by the political philosophy of the given prime minister in power, resulting in an inconsistent and contradictory approach to nongovernmental actors. KEY- WORDS: Japanese civil society, G7/8 summitry, global governance. THE GROUP OF 7 OR GROUP OF 8 (G7/8) SUMMITRY HAS HISTORICALLY BEEN challenging for civil society actors, but since the mid-1990s the G7/8 states have indicated a greater openness to civil society organization (CSO) participation in the summitry process. In the case of Japan, the sole participant from Asia at the

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2018

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