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Toward a Geneaology of Science

Toward a Geneaology of Science 281 Toward a Geneaology of Science Janicaud, Dominique, La Puissance du Rationnel. Paris: Gallimard, 1985 The publication of La Puissance du Rationnel gives us perhaps the first attempt to think the history of science from out of Heidegger's under- standing of Gestell. However, this attempt is not simply a further working out of Heidegger's thinking of technology. Rather, Janicaud shows how ' Gestell can only be understood from within the question of the rational: its limits, its unity, its historical significance. Moreover, Janicaud argues that the question of the rational is inseparable from the question of power (puissance). The rational has allied itself with power to such an extent that any understanding of the rational (and hence of Gestell) can only be accomplished by understanding the effects of power. Janicaud's task is to seize the power of the rational through, " ... a phenomenology which describes and identifies the effects of power, and a genealogy which reveals the type of rationality which engenders these effects" (84).' Janicaud begins his inquiry into the power of the rational through a phenomenology of technology. However the phenomenology is immedi- ately supplemented by a diacritical account. This supplementation is necessary insofar as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Toward a Geneaology of Science

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 17 (1): 281 – Jan 1, 1987

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1987 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916487X00166
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

281 Toward a Geneaology of Science Janicaud, Dominique, La Puissance du Rationnel. Paris: Gallimard, 1985 The publication of La Puissance du Rationnel gives us perhaps the first attempt to think the history of science from out of Heidegger's under- standing of Gestell. However, this attempt is not simply a further working out of Heidegger's thinking of technology. Rather, Janicaud shows how ' Gestell can only be understood from within the question of the rational: its limits, its unity, its historical significance. Moreover, Janicaud argues that the question of the rational is inseparable from the question of power (puissance). The rational has allied itself with power to such an extent that any understanding of the rational (and hence of Gestell) can only be accomplished by understanding the effects of power. Janicaud's task is to seize the power of the rational through, " ... a phenomenology which describes and identifies the effects of power, and a genealogy which reveals the type of rationality which engenders these effects" (84).' Janicaud begins his inquiry into the power of the rational through a phenomenology of technology. However the phenomenology is immedi- ately supplemented by a diacritical account. This supplementation is necessary insofar as

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1987

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