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To Medicalise or Not to Medicalise: Is that the Question?

To Medicalise or Not to Medicalise: Is that the Question? AbstractToday, female genital cutting (fgc) is more often performed by health professionals. In this dissertation we aim to answer the question of why mothers opt to medicalise their daughters’ cut, and how this decision relates to their social position within their community. We focus on Egypt and Kenya.The first important conclusion of our research is that increasing medicalisation and decreasing fgc prevalence can coexist. Moreover, we identify three major drivers behind mothers’ choice to medicalise their daughters’ cut. Firstly, mothers argue that they opt for a medicalised cut to reduce the health risks related to the cut. They seek a less harmful but still culturally acceptable alternative. Secondly, the medicalisation of fgc is socially stratified. Thirdly, medicalisation may act as a social norm in itself.In conclusion, we state that the debate about medicalisation should be more nuanced and that the general discourse on medicalisation should be challenged and empirically grounded. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Afrika Focus Brill

To Medicalise or Not to Medicalise: Is that the Question?

Afrika Focus , Volume 34 (1): 10 – Jun 9, 2021

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0772-084X
eISSN
2031-356X
DOI
10.1163/2031356x-34010007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractToday, female genital cutting (fgc) is more often performed by health professionals. In this dissertation we aim to answer the question of why mothers opt to medicalise their daughters’ cut, and how this decision relates to their social position within their community. We focus on Egypt and Kenya.The first important conclusion of our research is that increasing medicalisation and decreasing fgc prevalence can coexist. Moreover, we identify three major drivers behind mothers’ choice to medicalise their daughters’ cut. Firstly, mothers argue that they opt for a medicalised cut to reduce the health risks related to the cut. They seek a less harmful but still culturally acceptable alternative. Secondly, the medicalisation of fgc is socially stratified. Thirdly, medicalisation may act as a social norm in itself.In conclusion, we state that the debate about medicalisation should be more nuanced and that the general discourse on medicalisation should be challenged and empirically grounded.

Journal

Afrika FocusBrill

Published: Jun 9, 2021

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