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Time Fractured, Times Regained

Time Fractured, Times Regained Time Fractured, Times Regained David Wood. Time After Time. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2007. xii + 229 pp. Bibliography. Index. For some thirty years, David Wood has been refl ecting on time as a theme to which philosophy must always fi nd itself forced to return. Th e fi rst decade of these refl ections culminated in Th e Deconstruction of Time (1989). Here, Wood takes Derrida’s statement that the very concept of time is inherently metaphysical as the occasion to read key texts by Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, and Derrida himself. Wood ultimately accepts many of Derrida’s critiques of his predecessors but rejects the aporetic atmosphere of Derrida’s thought: if philosophy has failed, and perhaps must fail, to develop a theory of time itself, this is only the beginning—an invitation to think more tentatively and plurally about the times in which things unfold: cosmic time, dialectical time, phenomenological time, existential time, and the time of the sign (pt. 4, chap. 4). Th is book is a prolegomenon to a philosophy of the future—an open-ended inquiry into temporalities that is not hobbled by a metaphysics of presence and a logic of re-presentation. We now see some fruits of that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Time Fractured, Times Regained

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 39 (2): 316 – Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2009 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916409X448229
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Time Fractured, Times Regained David Wood. Time After Time. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2007. xii + 229 pp. Bibliography. Index. For some thirty years, David Wood has been refl ecting on time as a theme to which philosophy must always fi nd itself forced to return. Th e fi rst decade of these refl ections culminated in Th e Deconstruction of Time (1989). Here, Wood takes Derrida’s statement that the very concept of time is inherently metaphysical as the occasion to read key texts by Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, and Derrida himself. Wood ultimately accepts many of Derrida’s critiques of his predecessors but rejects the aporetic atmosphere of Derrida’s thought: if philosophy has failed, and perhaps must fail, to develop a theory of time itself, this is only the beginning—an invitation to think more tentatively and plurally about the times in which things unfold: cosmic time, dialectical time, phenomenological time, existential time, and the time of the sign (pt. 4, chap. 4). Th is book is a prolegomenon to a philosophy of the future—an open-ended inquiry into temporalities that is not hobbled by a metaphysics of presence and a logic of re-presentation. We now see some fruits of that

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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