Time and the Privileged Observer

Time and the Privileged Observer P.A. Hancock Time and the Privileged Observer “I would query by what sense it is we come to be informed of Time; for all the information we have from the senses are momentary, and only last during the impressions made by the object.” Robert Hooke (quoted in Whitrow, 2003) ABSTRACT This paper addresses the persistent problem concerning the integration of physical (external) with psychological (internal) expressions of time. While the histor y of cosmological science demonstrates the fallacy of the conception of the physically priv- ileged obser vational point in the Universe, I argue that it is just such a privileged position which characterizes the unitar y nature of individual human consciousness. A rational, but flawed impli- cation of this latter obser vation is that there is a unique spatio- temporal point within the brain at which reality is experienced. This flaw can be exposed through reference to the sensory simul- taneity problem. Evidence indicates that since no such unique neural location exists, the brain finesses the issue of absolute timing at a sensor y level by simply avoiding the problem of time-tagging such events altogether. While this finesse solves the simultaneity conundrum at a sensor y level, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Kronoscope Brill

Time and the Privileged Observer

Kronoscope, Volume 5 (2): 177 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1567-715x
eISSN
1568-5241
DOI
10.1163/156852405774858744
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

P.A. Hancock Time and the Privileged Observer “I would query by what sense it is we come to be informed of Time; for all the information we have from the senses are momentary, and only last during the impressions made by the object.” Robert Hooke (quoted in Whitrow, 2003) ABSTRACT This paper addresses the persistent problem concerning the integration of physical (external) with psychological (internal) expressions of time. While the histor y of cosmological science demonstrates the fallacy of the conception of the physically priv- ileged obser vational point in the Universe, I argue that it is just such a privileged position which characterizes the unitar y nature of individual human consciousness. A rational, but flawed impli- cation of this latter obser vation is that there is a unique spatio- temporal point within the brain at which reality is experienced. This flaw can be exposed through reference to the sensory simul- taneity problem. Evidence indicates that since no such unique neural location exists, the brain finesses the issue of absolute timing at a sensor y level by simply avoiding the problem of time-tagging such events altogether. While this finesse solves the simultaneity conundrum at a sensor y level,

Journal

KronoscopeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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