Theatrical Elements in the Episode On Board Lichas' Ship (Petronius, Satyrica 99.5-115)

Theatrical Elements in the Episode On Board Lichas' Ship (Petronius, Satyrica 99.5-115) THEATRICAL ELEMENTS IN THE EPISODE ON BOARD LICHAS' SHIP (PETRONIUS, SATYRICA 99.5-115).* BY COSTAS PANAYOTAKIS I. The sea-trip, which usually ends up with a shipwreck or with an attack by pirates, occurs in almost all of the surviving Greek romances, causing misfortunes for the heroes and enjoyment for the readers of the novels'). The reason for these trips is not always justified by the author or the narrator, and in such cases the audience of the novel simply accepts -or, rather, expects- its intro- duction in the plot as a narrative device for more adventures and entertainment to come. This is the case in Petronius' novel. The reason for the voyage is not apparent from the text. After the mimic interlude at the inn (92.1-99.4), where Encolpius, the anti-hero of the novel, and his lover, Giton, had rented a room, the two hustlers entrust themselves to the custody of Eumolpus (98.8), the manic poetaster, who will accompany them until the end of the novel's surviving fragments. The latter, having previously decided to take a sea-journey at some time (101.3), suggests in a rather casual man- ner (99.4): Itaque, quod bene eveniat, expedite sarcinulas et, vel sequimini me vel, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mnemosyne Brill

Theatrical Elements in the Episode On Board Lichas' Ship (Petronius, Satyrica 99.5-115)

Mnemosyne, Volume 47 (5): 596 – Jan 1, 1994

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1994 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0026-7074
eISSN
1568-525X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852594X00519
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THEATRICAL ELEMENTS IN THE EPISODE ON BOARD LICHAS' SHIP (PETRONIUS, SATYRICA 99.5-115).* BY COSTAS PANAYOTAKIS I. The sea-trip, which usually ends up with a shipwreck or with an attack by pirates, occurs in almost all of the surviving Greek romances, causing misfortunes for the heroes and enjoyment for the readers of the novels'). The reason for these trips is not always justified by the author or the narrator, and in such cases the audience of the novel simply accepts -or, rather, expects- its intro- duction in the plot as a narrative device for more adventures and entertainment to come. This is the case in Petronius' novel. The reason for the voyage is not apparent from the text. After the mimic interlude at the inn (92.1-99.4), where Encolpius, the anti-hero of the novel, and his lover, Giton, had rented a room, the two hustlers entrust themselves to the custody of Eumolpus (98.8), the manic poetaster, who will accompany them until the end of the novel's surviving fragments. The latter, having previously decided to take a sea-journey at some time (101.3), suggests in a rather casual man- ner (99.4): Itaque, quod bene eveniat, expedite sarcinulas et, vel sequimini me vel,

Journal

MnemosyneBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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