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The WTO and the Shrinking of Development Space

The WTO and the Shrinking of Development Space and The trade policy regimes that existed before and after the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations were strikingly different. Before 1994, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) was the primary institution of international trade. Though the GATT pillars of non-discrimination and reciprocity established text- based parameters on its Members' industrial policies, in practice the institution was relatively disengaged with its developing country Members and tended to overlook their policy violations (Hudec, 1987). In 1994, the World Trade Organization subsumed the GATT through the Single Undertaking. This event ushered in a new policy regime that expanded both the scope and the enforcement of new regulations. This article seeks to measure the extent to which policy implementation in the developing countries has reflected these changes. In this article, we examine the industrial policies implemented by the set of countries known as the Newly Industrialized Countries (Nics) during the GATT regime. For the purposes of this research, we created a single set of Nics including all of the first- tier and the higher performing second-tier countries.' The Nics in this set are all countries that: – had high growth rates; – had developmentally interventionalist governments; – used discriminatory http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World Investment and Trade Brill

The WTO and the Shrinking of Development Space

Journal of World Investment and Trade , Volume 7 (5): 23 – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1660-7112
eISSN
2211-9000
DOI
10.1163/221190006X00397
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

and The trade policy regimes that existed before and after the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations were strikingly different. Before 1994, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) was the primary institution of international trade. Though the GATT pillars of non-discrimination and reciprocity established text- based parameters on its Members' industrial policies, in practice the institution was relatively disengaged with its developing country Members and tended to overlook their policy violations (Hudec, 1987). In 1994, the World Trade Organization subsumed the GATT through the Single Undertaking. This event ushered in a new policy regime that expanded both the scope and the enforcement of new regulations. This article seeks to measure the extent to which policy implementation in the developing countries has reflected these changes. In this article, we examine the industrial policies implemented by the set of countries known as the Newly Industrialized Countries (Nics) during the GATT regime. For the purposes of this research, we created a single set of Nics including all of the first- tier and the higher performing second-tier countries.' The Nics in this set are all countries that: – had high growth rates; – had developmentally interventionalist governments; – used discriminatory

Journal

Journal of World Investment and TradeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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