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The World Bank and the “Equity Agenda”: An Assessment After Ten (or So) Years

The World Bank and the “Equity Agenda”: An Assessment After Ten (or So) Years AbstractThe theme of the World Bank’s 2006 World Development Report was Equity and Development. This article reviews the origins of the 2006 WDR, and why this was a controversial and political decision. It explains why equity is different from equality. It then considers what the World Bank and other agencies are doing to promote greater equity. Proequity policies require concern about distribution of both wealth and income, and the things that create greater opportunity. These issues are framed in terms of what some economists refer to as the “growth-inequality-poverty triangle.” Resolving some of the contradictions of this triangle—how pro-growth policies and a concern for the distribution of gains does or does not resolve the problem of absolute poverty—explains many of the problems that remain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The World Bank and the “Equity Agenda”: An Assessment After Ten (or So) Years

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02404010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe theme of the World Bank’s 2006 World Development Report was Equity and Development. This article reviews the origins of the 2006 WDR, and why this was a controversial and political decision. It explains why equity is different from equality. It then considers what the World Bank and other agencies are doing to promote greater equity. Proequity policies require concern about distribution of both wealth and income, and the things that create greater opportunity. These issues are framed in terms of what some economists refer to as the “growth-inequality-poverty triangle.” Resolving some of the contradictions of this triangle—how pro-growth policies and a concern for the distribution of gains does or does not resolve the problem of absolute poverty—explains many of the problems that remain.

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Dec 10, 2018

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