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The Transformation of Language at Another Beginning

The Transformation of Language at Another Beginning 1 The Transformation of Language at Another Beginning ROBERT BERNASCONI University of Essex Derrida's starting-point is the end of philosophy, or, as he would prefer to say, "the closure of metaphysics." The two terms "philosophy" and "metaphysics" are for Derrida, as they became for Heidegger, equivalent ways of referring to the tradition. "End" is not an equivalent for "closure" (G 14/4). Derrida uses the term "closure" because he refuses to speak of the "end" of philosophy in the sense of a termination. That philosophy is, if not finished, at least at an end is something which Derrida does not see any need to establish; he points to Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche and Heidegger (ED 117/79). It is for him quite simply the . context in which "those who are still called philosophers... in remembrance at least" ask the one question left to them-the question of the closure, that is the question of the relation between belonging to philosophy and achieving an opening beyond philosophical discourse (ED 163/110). Derrida's word "closure" states his fundamental concern that it is impossible for us simply to transgress metaphysics, to leave it unambiguously behind us and stand unequivocally outside it. But it does not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Transformation of Language at Another Beginning

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 13 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1983

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1983 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916483X00016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 The Transformation of Language at Another Beginning ROBERT BERNASCONI University of Essex Derrida's starting-point is the end of philosophy, or, as he would prefer to say, "the closure of metaphysics." The two terms "philosophy" and "metaphysics" are for Derrida, as they became for Heidegger, equivalent ways of referring to the tradition. "End" is not an equivalent for "closure" (G 14/4). Derrida uses the term "closure" because he refuses to speak of the "end" of philosophy in the sense of a termination. That philosophy is, if not finished, at least at an end is something which Derrida does not see any need to establish; he points to Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche and Heidegger (ED 117/79). It is for him quite simply the . context in which "those who are still called philosophers... in remembrance at least" ask the one question left to them-the question of the closure, that is the question of the relation between belonging to philosophy and achieving an opening beyond philosophical discourse (ED 163/110). Derrida's word "closure" states his fundamental concern that it is impossible for us simply to transgress metaphysics, to leave it unambiguously behind us and stand unequivocally outside it. But it does not

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1983

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