The Temporal Turn in German Idealism: Hegel and After

The Temporal Turn in German Idealism: Hegel and After THE TEMPORAL TURN IN GERMAN IDEALISM: HEGEL AND AFTER by JOHN M c CUMBER The University of California, Los Angeles A BSTRACT Hegel’s rejection of the Kantian thing-in-itself makes the “an sich” an ingredient in experience—that about a thing which is not yet present to us is what it is “an sich.” Hegel bars thus any philosophical appeal to anything construed as atemporal, a path which I argue was also taken by Nietzsche, Foucault, Rorty, and Habermas. Unlike them, however, Hegel pursues a project of systematic philosophy, which now consists in showing how temporal things mutually support one another. The recent Continental philosophers I discuss do not share this systematic conception; hence some of their most distinctive insights and problems. “German Idealism” means, at its broadest, post-Kantian German phi- losophy through Hegel (on whom this essay will concentrate). This tradition is, perhaps next to Neoplatonism, the least understood of phi- losophy’s major traditions. Indeed, the name “German Idealism” itself is somewhat deceptive. German Idealists did not, by and large, believe that esse ist percipi —and so G. E. Moore’s “Refutation of Idealism” missed them completely. 1 They are also not “German,” if only because national philosophies are not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Temporal Turn in German Idealism: Hegel and After

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
D.O.I.
10.1163/15691640260490557
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE TEMPORAL TURN IN GERMAN IDEALISM: HEGEL AND AFTER by JOHN M c CUMBER The University of California, Los Angeles A BSTRACT Hegel’s rejection of the Kantian thing-in-itself makes the “an sich” an ingredient in experience—that about a thing which is not yet present to us is what it is “an sich.” Hegel bars thus any philosophical appeal to anything construed as atemporal, a path which I argue was also taken by Nietzsche, Foucault, Rorty, and Habermas. Unlike them, however, Hegel pursues a project of systematic philosophy, which now consists in showing how temporal things mutually support one another. The recent Continental philosophers I discuss do not share this systematic conception; hence some of their most distinctive insights and problems. “German Idealism” means, at its broadest, post-Kantian German phi- losophy through Hegel (on whom this essay will concentrate). This tradition is, perhaps next to Neoplatonism, the least understood of phi- losophy’s major traditions. Indeed, the name “German Idealism” itself is somewhat deceptive. German Idealists did not, by and large, believe that esse ist percipi —and so G. E. Moore’s “Refutation of Idealism” missed them completely. 1 They are also not “German,” if only because national philosophies are not

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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