The Suckling Behaviour of Domestic Pigs in a Semi-Natural Environment

The Suckling Behaviour of Domestic Pigs in a Semi-Natural Environment THE SUCKLING BEHAVIOUR OF DOMESTIC PIGS IN A SEMI-NATURAL ENVIRONMENT by RUTH C. NEWBERRY1) and DAVID G. M. WOOD-GUSH2) (The Edinburgh School of Agriculture, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, Scotland) (Acc. 25-VIII-1984) Introduction The suckling behaviour of intensively-reared domestic pigs has received much attention. The development of a stable teat order has been des- cribed by McBRIDE (1963) and HEMSwoRTH et al. (1976), and HORRELL & BENNETT (1981) have indicated that difficulty in fostering a piglet after the development of the teat order is due to its tendency to fight for its favoured teat in the corresponding position of the foster mother's udder. GILL & THOMSON (1956) found that individual sows tended to suckle in a characteristic position, and in sows which lay on one side, piglets suckling from the upper row of teats obtained more milk than those suckling from the lower row. In addition, piglets suckling at the anterior end of the ud- der received 15.3 % more milk than those at the posterior end. McBRIDE et al. (1965); FRASER & MORLEY-JONES (1975); HARTSOCK et al. (1977); FRASER 8t al. (1979) and CAMPBELL & DUNKIN (1982) also found small positive correlations between http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

The Suckling Behaviour of Domestic Pigs in a Semi-Natural Environment

Behaviour, Volume 95 (1-2): 11 – Jan 1, 1985

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1985 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853985X00028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE SUCKLING BEHAVIOUR OF DOMESTIC PIGS IN A SEMI-NATURAL ENVIRONMENT by RUTH C. NEWBERRY1) and DAVID G. M. WOOD-GUSH2) (The Edinburgh School of Agriculture, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, Scotland) (Acc. 25-VIII-1984) Introduction The suckling behaviour of intensively-reared domestic pigs has received much attention. The development of a stable teat order has been des- cribed by McBRIDE (1963) and HEMSwoRTH et al. (1976), and HORRELL & BENNETT (1981) have indicated that difficulty in fostering a piglet after the development of the teat order is due to its tendency to fight for its favoured teat in the corresponding position of the foster mother's udder. GILL & THOMSON (1956) found that individual sows tended to suckle in a characteristic position, and in sows which lay on one side, piglets suckling from the upper row of teats obtained more milk than those suckling from the lower row. In addition, piglets suckling at the anterior end of the ud- der received 15.3 % more milk than those at the posterior end. McBRIDE et al. (1965); FRASER & MORLEY-JONES (1975); HARTSOCK et al. (1977); FRASER 8t al. (1979) and CAMPBELL & DUNKIN (1982) also found small positive correlations between

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1985

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