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The Subject of Praxis

The Subject of Praxis 215 REVIEW ARTICLES The Subject of Praxis Jacques Taminiaux, The Thracian Maid and the Professional Thinker: Arendt and Heidegger. Translated and edited by Michael Gendre. Albany: N.Y., State Uni- versity of New York Press, 1997. The Thractan Maid and the Professional Thinker: Arendt and Heidegger begins with the history of an irony. Recounting Arendt's evocation of the seriousness with which in the Theatetus Plato recounts the story of the peasant woman from Thrace who laughs as Thales falls into the pit, Taminiaux suggests that Arendt's own view of the story is much more ironic. Heidegger, Taminiaux points out, also recounts this story in Die Frage nach dem Dinge, a recounting in which Heidegger takes care to add that thinking is an activity about which house- maids necessarily laugh. What follows in this remarkable analysis of Arendt and Heidegger is a long reflection on how Arendtian irony increases in the course of her thought as she increasingly distances herself from the serious- ness of professional thinkers, while Heidegger increasingly forgets the neces- sary laughter of the housemaids, joining ranks with those serious thinkers such as Plato for whom the housemaid's laughter becomes an indication of her inability to embrace http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Subject of Praxis

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 29 (1): 215 – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1999 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916499X00136
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

215 REVIEW ARTICLES The Subject of Praxis Jacques Taminiaux, The Thracian Maid and the Professional Thinker: Arendt and Heidegger. Translated and edited by Michael Gendre. Albany: N.Y., State Uni- versity of New York Press, 1997. The Thractan Maid and the Professional Thinker: Arendt and Heidegger begins with the history of an irony. Recounting Arendt's evocation of the seriousness with which in the Theatetus Plato recounts the story of the peasant woman from Thrace who laughs as Thales falls into the pit, Taminiaux suggests that Arendt's own view of the story is much more ironic. Heidegger, Taminiaux points out, also recounts this story in Die Frage nach dem Dinge, a recounting in which Heidegger takes care to add that thinking is an activity about which house- maids necessarily laugh. What follows in this remarkable analysis of Arendt and Heidegger is a long reflection on how Arendtian irony increases in the course of her thought as she increasingly distances herself from the serious- ness of professional thinkers, while Heidegger increasingly forgets the neces- sary laughter of the housemaids, joining ranks with those serious thinkers such as Plato for whom the housemaid's laughter becomes an indication of her inability to embrace

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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