The Stratification of Muscovite Society: The Townsmen

The Stratification of Muscovite Society: The Townsmen ARTICLE RICHARD HELLIE (Chicago, U.S.A.) To the memory of Anatolii Mikhailovich Sakharov 1923-78 The Stratification of Muscovite Society: The Townsmen One of the relatively unknown events of Russian history was the creation of a caste-like, rigidly stratified urban society in the century between the Sudebnik of 1550 and the Uloahenie of 1649. In the last decades of the sixteenth century, the urban population was relatively free and could move about at will. Moreover, there were no restrictions on who could engage in trade and industry and few on who could own urban property. By the middle of the seventeenth century all this had changed: Migration into and out of towns was made illegal and the urban taxpayers were granted a monopoly on "town" occupations and ownership of urban property. This was the era when nearly all of society became rigidly stratified, when, by 1649, a child's station at birth prescribed whether he was expected to spend the rest of his life as a peasant serf, a member of the government service class, perhaps a clergyman, or a townsman.1 The evolution of serfdom , and the service classes had their own dynamics. As I have shown in my Enserfment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian History Brill

The Stratification of Muscovite Society: The Townsmen

Russian History, Volume 5 (1): 119 – Jan 1, 1978

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1978 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0094-288X
eISSN
1876-3316
D.O.I.
10.1163/187633178X00079
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARTICLE RICHARD HELLIE (Chicago, U.S.A.) To the memory of Anatolii Mikhailovich Sakharov 1923-78 The Stratification of Muscovite Society: The Townsmen One of the relatively unknown events of Russian history was the creation of a caste-like, rigidly stratified urban society in the century between the Sudebnik of 1550 and the Uloahenie of 1649. In the last decades of the sixteenth century, the urban population was relatively free and could move about at will. Moreover, there were no restrictions on who could engage in trade and industry and few on who could own urban property. By the middle of the seventeenth century all this had changed: Migration into and out of towns was made illegal and the urban taxpayers were granted a monopoly on "town" occupations and ownership of urban property. This was the era when nearly all of society became rigidly stratified, when, by 1649, a child's station at birth prescribed whether he was expected to spend the rest of his life as a peasant serf, a member of the government service class, perhaps a clergyman, or a townsman.1 The evolution of serfdom , and the service classes had their own dynamics. As I have shown in my Enserfment

Journal

Russian HistoryBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1978

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