The Story of Job and the Credibility of God

The Story of Job and the Credibility of God Abstract This essay examines the Book of Job via a narrative critical lens and demonstrates that contemporary treatments of the text portraying Job’s suffering as the central concern and the theophany as either insensitive or irrelevant to Job’s plight neglect the narrative elements at play. Rather, read as a story, the main conflict of the book concerns whether God’s claim regarding Job’s righteousness can be trusted. The main protagonist of the story is God, while the role of the antagonist passes at different points from the Satan to Job’s friends, and finally—but least significantly—to Job himself. The theophany is therefore addressed to each of these parties simultaneously, and primarily back to the Satan. As such, the theophany constitutes not only the climax of the story, but the center of a narrative chiasm wherein challenges resulting from the Satan’s machinations are decisively resolved by God’s self-revelation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Horizons in Biblical Theology Brill

The Story of Job and the Credibility of God

Horizons in Biblical Theology, Volume 34 (2): 103 – Jan 1, 2012

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0195-9085
eISSN
1871-2207
D.O.I.
10.1163/187122012X627795
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This essay examines the Book of Job via a narrative critical lens and demonstrates that contemporary treatments of the text portraying Job’s suffering as the central concern and the theophany as either insensitive or irrelevant to Job’s plight neglect the narrative elements at play. Rather, read as a story, the main conflict of the book concerns whether God’s claim regarding Job’s righteousness can be trusted. The main protagonist of the story is God, while the role of the antagonist passes at different points from the Satan to Job’s friends, and finally—but least significantly—to Job himself. The theophany is therefore addressed to each of these parties simultaneously, and primarily back to the Satan. As such, the theophany constitutes not only the climax of the story, but the center of a narrative chiasm wherein challenges resulting from the Satan’s machinations are decisively resolved by God’s self-revelation.

Journal

Horizons in Biblical TheologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2012

Keywords: narrative; narrative criticism; credibility; suffering; retribution theory; Job

References

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