The St. Vincent (Lesser Antilles) herpetofauna: Conservation concerns

The St. Vincent (Lesser Antilles) herpetofauna: Conservation concerns The St. Vincent (Lesser Antilles) herpetofauna: Conservation concerns Robert Powell 1 , Robert W. Henderson 2 1 Department of Biology, Avila University, Kansas City, Missouri 64145, USA; e-mail: robert.powell@avila.edu 2 Section of Vertebrate Zoology, Milwaukee Public Museum, 800 W. Wells St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233-1478, USA; e-mail: henderson@mpm.edu Abstract. The Lesser Antillean island of St. Vincent harbors 18 species of terrestrial amphibians and reptiles: four frogs (including the endemic Pristimantis shrevei ), one turtle, ten lizards (including endemic Anolis griseus and A. trinitatis ), and three snakes (including endemic Corallus cookii and Chironius vincenti ). In addition, four species of marine turtles are known from the region. Ecological relationships of an introduced frog ( E. johnstonei ) and an introduced lizard ( A. sagrei ) should be monitored in order to evaluate any potentially negative impact on endemic congeners. Two endangered endemic species ( P. shrevei and C. vincenti ) may benefit from sympatry with the endemic parrot, Amazona guildingii , the national bird of St. Vincent, with which they share high-quality upland forest habitat. Like other West Indian herpetofaunas, that on St. Vincent faces threats that include dramatic habitat alterations, introduced predators (mongooses, domestic cats) and competitors (e.g., http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Herpetology Brill

The St. Vincent (Lesser Antilles) herpetofauna: Conservation concerns

Applied Herpetology, Volume 4 (4): 295 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7539
eISSN
1570-7547
D.O.I.
10.1163/157075407782424539
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The St. Vincent (Lesser Antilles) herpetofauna: Conservation concerns Robert Powell 1 , Robert W. Henderson 2 1 Department of Biology, Avila University, Kansas City, Missouri 64145, USA; e-mail: robert.powell@avila.edu 2 Section of Vertebrate Zoology, Milwaukee Public Museum, 800 W. Wells St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233-1478, USA; e-mail: henderson@mpm.edu Abstract. The Lesser Antillean island of St. Vincent harbors 18 species of terrestrial amphibians and reptiles: four frogs (including the endemic Pristimantis shrevei ), one turtle, ten lizards (including endemic Anolis griseus and A. trinitatis ), and three snakes (including endemic Corallus cookii and Chironius vincenti ). In addition, four species of marine turtles are known from the region. Ecological relationships of an introduced frog ( E. johnstonei ) and an introduced lizard ( A. sagrei ) should be monitored in order to evaluate any potentially negative impact on endemic congeners. Two endangered endemic species ( P. shrevei and C. vincenti ) may benefit from sympatry with the endemic parrot, Amazona guildingii , the national bird of St. Vincent, with which they share high-quality upland forest habitat. Like other West Indian herpetofaunas, that on St. Vincent faces threats that include dramatic habitat alterations, introduced predators (mongooses, domestic cats) and competitors (e.g.,

Journal

Applied HerpetologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: ST. VINCENT; CONSERVATION; REPTILES; AMPHIBIANS

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