The Roman Empire and the New Testament: An Essential Guide

The Roman Empire and the New Testament: An Essential Guide 320 Book Reviews / Religion & Th eology 16 (2009) 299–334 Th e Roman Empire and the New Testament: An Essential Guide . By Warren Carter. Nashville: Abingdon, 2006 (Abingdon Essential Guides). Pp. 148. GBP 10.00 (Paperback). ISBN 0-687- 34391-4148. Th is introduction is “not about ‘Roman backgrounds’ to the New Testament, because it under- stands Rome’s empire to be in the foreground. It is the world in which fi rst-century Christians lived their daily lives. It is the world that the New Testament writings negotiate throughout. . . . Th is book recognizes that Rome’s empire does not disappear or go away when it is not explicitly mentioned. It is always there. It forms the pervasive context of the New Testament writings” (ix). Carter sets out with a succinct description of “Th e Roman Imperial World” as hierarchical, aristocratic, agrarian and legionary (1–13). His basic thesis is that “Th e Roman Empire provides the ever-present political, economic, societal, and religious framework and context for the New Testament’s claims, language, structures, personnel, and scenes. Th e New Testament texts guide fi rst-century followers of Jesus in negotiating Rome’s power that crucifi ed Jesus” (1). Carter dis- cusses the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Religion and Theology Brill

The Roman Empire and the New Testament: An Essential Guide

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-roman-empire-and-the-new-testament-an-essential-guide-qxvXF0yKrt
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2009 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1023-0807
eISSN
1574-3012
D.O.I.
10.1163/102308009X12561890524031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

320 Book Reviews / Religion & Th eology 16 (2009) 299–334 Th e Roman Empire and the New Testament: An Essential Guide . By Warren Carter. Nashville: Abingdon, 2006 (Abingdon Essential Guides). Pp. 148. GBP 10.00 (Paperback). ISBN 0-687- 34391-4148. Th is introduction is “not about ‘Roman backgrounds’ to the New Testament, because it under- stands Rome’s empire to be in the foreground. It is the world in which fi rst-century Christians lived their daily lives. It is the world that the New Testament writings negotiate throughout. . . . Th is book recognizes that Rome’s empire does not disappear or go away when it is not explicitly mentioned. It is always there. It forms the pervasive context of the New Testament writings” (ix). Carter sets out with a succinct description of “Th e Roman Imperial World” as hierarchical, aristocratic, agrarian and legionary (1–13). His basic thesis is that “Th e Roman Empire provides the ever-present political, economic, societal, and religious framework and context for the New Testament’s claims, language, structures, personnel, and scenes. Th e New Testament texts guide fi rst-century followers of Jesus in negotiating Rome’s power that crucifi ed Jesus” (1). Carter dis- cusses the

Journal

Religion and TheologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off